Fall Enrollment

Fall 2018 Enrollment 

Welcome to Fall 2018 at the iSchool at Illinois!

  1. Registration does not begin until July 9th.
  2. You must fill out a Request for Approval to Enroll webform FIRST. I will need to check seat availability before I approve official enrollment. There are no guaranteed seats in these courses.

Please contact Karla Lucht, at (217) 244-3810 or ischool-continuinged [at] illinois.edu if you have questions or need assistance.

NOTES

  • Requests are approved based on availability of seats, etc.
  • Times listed are Central Time
  • Deadline to register: August 13th

Online courses

  • Our online courses are live, synchronous courses which meet during the listed time (central time). You will need a headset microphone to participate.

IS 490DBO Introduction to Databases

The course provides students with both theoretical and practical training in good database design. By the end of the course students will create a conceptual data model using entity-relationship diagrams, understand the importance of referential integrity and how to enforce data integrity constraints when creating a database. Students will be proficient in writing basic queries in the structured query language (SQL) and have a general understanding of relational database theory including normalization. 

Mondays, 6:30-9:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 490TEO Introduction to Technology in LIS

This is an introductory course in the fundamentals of technology in LIS. Following an overview of information system concepts, terminology and usage in organizations, there will be discussions covering a wide variety of topics including hardware and software, systems development (traditional and modern methods), programming languages, databases and the internet. Special attention will be paid to the knowledge and skills needed to succeed at GSLIS (servers, file access and management, office software, markup languages, website design and development, etc.) and LIS professional settings. Application of concepts is key. 

Thursdays, 6:30-8:30pm

2 or 4 credit hours

IS 490YSO Youth Services Community Engagement

This service-learning course will examine youth services by exploring how young people's information and educational needs are met by community institutions and organizations. We will draw upon youth services librarianship and youth informatics concepts to explore youth informatics in after school programs, community center programs, and other institutions that serve young people. A significant portion of coursework will take the form of service learning or community-based research via approved projects that match students' interests. 2 Credit students will be enrolled for the last eight weeks of the term. 4 Credit students will be enrolled for the full term, and during the first half of the course will examine the implementation of computing and coding programs in libraries and other youth services community informatics settings.

Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00pm

2 or 4 credit hours

IS 506AO2 Youth Services Librarianship

Theory and techniques in planning, implementing and evaluating library programs/services for youth (age 0-18) in public and school libraries/media centers; the knowledge base, skills, and competencies needed by the library media professional in the development of all aspects of young people's reading/viewing/listening and information literacy skills.

Tuesdays, 6:00-8:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 508AO Collection Development

Examines issues affecting the development and management of collections for academic, public, special, and school libraries: collection development policies, collection assessment, the marketplace, publishing, legal issues, and budget allocation; document delivery; collaboration and cooperation.

Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 518AO Social Science Research in LIS

Introduces students to the fundamentals of doing social science research in LIS. Students will learn how to frame a research problem, choose an appropriate research method, apply it, and write up the research for presentation and publication.

Thursdays, 6:15-8:15pm

4 credit hours

IS 555AO Usability Engineering

The course provides an introduction to: issues in Human Computer Interaction; analysis of interfaces and their use; the interface design process as an engineering activity; designing usable interfaces under constraints; and the rapid prototyping and evaluation cycle. The course covers interface design in multiple contexts including websites, web-based applications, smartphone apps, regular computer apps and new contexts of interacting with computers.

Wednesdays, 6:00-8:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 567AO Academic Librarianship

Introduces the higher education environment in which academic librarians and other information professionals operate in order to prepare students for leadership roles both within academic libraries and in their parent institutions. This course explores academic librarianship through a variety of lenses including: history and organization of higher education; accreditation; characteristics of students; roles of faculty and other campus professionals; and current issues and challenges.

Wednesdays, 1:30-3:30pm

4 credit hours

IS 569AO Financial Management

Designed to familiarize the student with the basic principles of library financial administration, including budgeting and planning within the mission and goals of the organization. Provides an orientation to the variety of financial management techniques appropriate for libraries and information centers, with an emphasis on sources for obtaining financial support, controlling expenditures, creating and controlling budgets, financial decision making and exploring specific financial and budgetary problems for the major operational areas of libraries - public services, technical services, information technology and facilities.

Tuesdays, 4:00-6:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 581AO Administration and Use of Archival Materials

Administration of archives and manuscript collections in various types of institutions. Theoretical principles and archival practices of appraisal, acquisition, accessioning, arrangement, description, preservation, and reference services. Topics will include: records management programs, collecting archives programs/special collections, legal and ethical issues, public programming and advocacy, and the impact of new information technologies for preservation and access. 

Mondays, 7:00-9:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 585AO International Librarianship

Focuses on international librarianship (how librarians communicate on international issues) and how that differs from comparative librarianship (the comparative study of library services in specific contexts). Examines how concepts such as "one-world" and "free flow of information" are valid in the international information arena; the importance of internationalizing library education; the role of international information agencies and the need for formulating information policies. Local and regional issues relating to library and information science are studied in the context of global issues.

Thursdays, 6:15-8:15pm

4 credit hours

IS 590ABO Introduction to Artists Books

*(8-week course 10/22-12/12)

This course will look broadly at the development of modern artists' book from a historical perspective by tracing important precursors (including William Blake, William Morris, the 17th century cut-up Little Gidding Harmony bible) but focusing primarily on modern and contemporary artists’ books. Our understanding of artists' books will be rooted in two distinct but sometimes overlapping frameworks: concept and craft. We will look at artists’ books in the context of libraries, museums, and alternative art spaces. We will read texts ranging from established book historians to contemporary art critics, as well as reading and examining artists’ books via digital facsimile.

Tuesdays, 6:00-8:00pm

2 credit hours

IS 590BBO Bookbinding, History, Principle, Practice

*(8-week course 8/27-10/19)

 A hands-on exploration of multiple styles of bookbinding. Students will acquire fundamental technical knowledge by creating a variety of book structures using traditional tools and materials. An appreciation of the history of bindings will be gained through readings and virtual visits to Rare Book and Manuscript Rooms.

Mondays, 7:00-9:00pm

2 credit hours

IS 590ERO E-Resources Management

In-depth exploration of current topics in the rapidly changing world of e-resources management in libraries and information centers. Discusses trends, problems, and issues relating to how e- resources are reshaping the entire spectrum of library service. Example areas of focus include open access publishing, scholarly communication, proprietary as well as open source e-resources management systems, licensing and copyright issues, consortia, usage statistics, balancing e- resources with more traditional collections and services, and intellectual access challenges in a highly diffuse information environment.

Mondays, 7:00-9:00pm

4 credit hours

IS 590GW2 Grant Writing for Libraries

*(8-week course 8/27-10/19)

An introduction to the craft of writing and submitting successful grant applications. Grant writing is critical for multi-type libraries, nonprofit information entities, and other service-based organizations. Through a combination of individual and group assignments, and peer and instructor review, students will learn how to identify grant sources and strategically target their writing to those sources.

Tuesdays, 6:00-8:00pm

2 credit hours

IS 590SSO Library Services to Spanish-Speaking Patrons

*(8-week course 10/22-12/12)

Most librarians will at some point in their careers have the opportunity to work with patrons who are seeking resources in Spanish. According to the United States Census, 38.3 million Hispanics in the US speak Spanish at home, giving the United States the 4th highest number of Spanish-speakers worldwide (Mexico has 120 million, Colombia 48 million, and Argentina 43 million). This steady increase in population means that the number of Spanish-speakers using public and academic libraries is also on the rise. In this 8-week course, students will pick a type of library (public, community college, or academic) to use for their assignments. The assignments will include answering reference or research queries, creating user guides, and selecting Spanish-language materials to build a collection supporting their user population. Students are encouraged to try to attend the bookfair in Guadalajara, Mexico in order to use the bookfair as a laboratory for the courses final project (partial travel grants can be sought through ALAs Free Pass program; travel would begin Saturday or Sunday after Thanksgiving). Attendance at the bookfair is not required and students unable to travel will have alternate means of completing all assignments. Because this is a variable credit course with an optional trip, there are many different ways to complete the requirements for the course.

Mondays, 6:00-8:00pm

2 or 4 credit hours

 

On-campus Courses

IS 510A Adult Public Services

The literature, history, and problems of providing library service to the general adult user; investigation of user characteristics and needs, and the effectiveness of various types of adult services. 

Mondays, 9:00-11:50am

4 credit hours

IS 518A Community Informatics

Survey of an emerging field that studies how local, historical communities use information and communication technologies or otherwise access, create, organize, and share information. Covers key principles for working in libraries or the wider non-profit/public sectors as individuals, organizations, and communities harness new technologies and media. Prepares both professionals and researchers, whatever their technology background. Especially useful for those interested in public or community libraries, youth services, university public engagement, social work, education, and anyone interested in working with or studying underserved communities.

Thursdays, 9:00-11:50am

4 credit hours

IS 567 Academic Librarianship

Introduces the higher education environment in which academic librarians and other information professionals operate in order to prepare students for leadership roles both within academic libraries and in their parent institutions. This course explores academic librarianship through a variety of lenses including: history and organization of higher education; accreditation; characteristics of students; roles of faculty and other campus professionals; and current issues and challenges. 

 

Wednesdays, 9:00-11:50am

4 credit hours

IS 590AV AV Materials in Libraries and Archives

As analog film, video, and audio materials and playback equipment become obsolete, libraries and archives with audiovisual (AV) materials in their collections face great challenges in preserving these materials. AV preservation and collection is costly, time-consuming, and requires specialized knowledge. This course will discuss the ways that librarians and archivists are responding to the challenges of audiovisual handling, preservation and collection. Laptop Required. 

Thursdays, 9:00-11:50am

4 credit hours

IS 590IN Internet of Things (IoT) and Application for Business Data Analytics

Relying primarily on case studies, this course will help develop the students’ understanding of how the IoT enables Business Data Analytics. Lectures and readings will be focused on the impact to a company’s business model created by IoT data and analytics. Because of the disruptive nature of IoT sensors or data, IT Innovation will also be discussed. While the course will reflect a practitioner’s view, the material will be presented on a solid academic under-pinning. 

Thursdays, 1:00-4:00pm

4 credit hours