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IN THE NEWS

Sep. 12, 2017
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Nicole A. Cooke, assistant professor and MS/LIS program director, will present a workshop at the two-day international symposium, Diversity by Design: Reframing Diversity Discourse in Canada, which will be held on September 13-14 in Toronto. The event will bring together institutions of higher education, information and cultural institutions, community partners, and governmental organizations.

The concept of "diversity by design" was introduced in the publication, "Diversity by Design," by Keren Dali, assistant professor in the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Alberta, and Nadia Caidi, associate professor in the iSchool at the University of Toronto. The symposium will examine the question of why, “despite our best efforts, the state of diversity is not getting better significantly or quickly...

Jul. 26, 2017

Three iSchool master's students have been selected by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Committee on Diversity and Leadership to participate in the Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) as ARL diversity scholars.

Underwritten by ARL member libraries, the IRDW offers numerous financial benefits to program participants as well as leadership development provided through the ARL Annual Leadership Symposium, a formal mentoring program, career placement assistance, and an ARL research library visit. This program reflects the commitment of ARL members to create a diverse research library professional community that will better meet the challenges of changing demographics in higher education and the emphasis on global perspectives in the academy.

The 2017–2019 ARL diversity scholars are: 

Jul. 5, 2017
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Nicole A. Cooke, assistant professor and MS/LIS program director, has received two grants from the American Library Association (ALA) for her diversity research. The grants, worth $7,500, include the Carnegie Whitney Award and the ALA Diversity Research Grant. 

She received the Carnegie Whitney Award for her project, "The Interracial Books for Children Bulletin: A Bibliography of Diverse Books." The purpose of the project is to compile a bibliography of the books and media reviewed by the Interracial Books for Children Bulletin. 

"With the goal of addressing LIS practitioners and scholars, children's literature scholars, authors, illustrators, publishers, and multicultural literature aficionados, this resource will be used as a teaching and research tool in classrooms and will aid collection development librarians in diversifying their collections," said Cooke.

Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney (PhD '13), assistant professor in the School of Library and...

Jun. 21, 2017
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Assistant Professor Elizabeth Hoiem will present her research on the representation of slavery in children's nonfiction books at the Children's Literature Association conference (ChLA 2017), which will be held on June 22-24 in Tampa, Florida. The theme of the conference, "Imagined Futures," explores the many possible futures to be found in, through, and for children's literature.

Hoiem will give the talk, "The Politics of How Things Are Made: Representations of Slavery and Violence in Children’s Histories of Technology," during a session titled, "Borders and Frontiers: Explorations of the Past." According to Hoiem, production stories—a genre that includes Amelia Alderson Opie's abolitionist chapbook, The Progress of Sugar (1826); David Macaulay's Cathedral (1973); Laban Carrick Hill and Bryan Collier's Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet,...

May. 11, 2017
Photo by Jewel Armstrong Player

Thirty minority students were recruited in the early 1970s to attend the Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences (now the School of Information Sciences) at the University of Illinois. Called the Carnegie Scholars, all but one of the black and Latino students graduated, and they went on to successful careers in and out of the library profession.

The program was an outgrowth of Project 500, the University of Illinois' 1968 initiative to increase the number of black students enrolled and increase the diversity of the campus. Like that program, the Carnegie Scholars suffered from discrimination, low expectations and a lack of support, writes Assistant Professor Nicole A. Cooke in a recently published article.

Cooke reviewed the history of the Carnegie Scholars program in her article, "The GSLS Carnegie...

Feb. 16, 2017
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A book edited by Assistant Professor Nicole A. Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney (PhD '13) has been published by Litwin Books/Library Juice Press. Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom is the first in the publisher’s series on critical race studies and multiculturalism in library and information science. Chapter contributors include iSchool alumni Bharat Mehra (PhD '04), Vandana Singh (PhD '08), and Sarah Park Dahlen (PhD '09). The book is based on a workshop organized by Cooke and Sweeney for the 2015 ALISE annual conference.

Publisher's Description: Teaching for Justice highlights the commitment and efforts of LIS faculty and instructors who feature social justice theory and strategies in their courses and classroom practices. This book is geared towards LIS instructors who have begun to incorporate social justice into their course content, as well as those who are interested in learning more about how to address social justice in their...

Feb. 13, 2017

Master's students Jessica Colbert and Daniel Mills will be presenting workshops on behalf of the iSchool Queer Library Alliance at the 2017 Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Trans, and Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC 2017), which will be held February 17-19 at Navy Pier in Chicago. "United in Solidarity" is the theme of this year's conference, which marks the 25th anniversary of the MBLGTACC. 

Colbert and Mills will present a workshop designed to educate LGBT college students about online privacy inspired by the Library Freedom Project:

Library Freedom Project is a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to address the problems of surveillance by making real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries....

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