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RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS

soda-ring
Institute of Museum and Library Services

This project will create both a master’s and doctoral-level specialization in Socio-technical Data Analytics (SODA). Partnerships with local researchers and businesses who already work with large data-sets will enable master's graduates to receive first-hand experience with both the social and technical implications of large digital data collections, and thus be well-prepared for leadership roles in academic and corporate environments. Similarly, doctoral students will consider multiple stages of the information lifecycle, which will help to ensure that their research findings will generalize to a range of scholarly and business practices. Case studies from these partners will be incorporated into new courses that will initially be held on campus and will later be evolved to the School...

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National Science Foundation

The United States is a world leader in technological innovation. However, as our technology has advanced, the need for cyber security experts has increased dramatically. Unfortunately, the U.S. lacks the cyber security workforce needed to manage many of the threats our society faces.

One method used to attract talented individuals to careers in cyber security has been the organization of cyber security competitions. Such contests aim to train the next generation of cyber security specialists using hands-on competition. Examining the overall effectiveness of cyber security competitions and expanding our understanding of the individuals who participate are keys to future success in cyber security recruitment.

Using a carefully constructed survey, the researchers will...

TransformingTaxonomicInterfaces
National Science Foundation

The goal of this research is to help researchers develop and use relatively simple tools to describe species in a way that make those descriptions easier to share with other scientists and easier for computers to process and analyze. The approach is bottom-up and iterative, involving the rapid prototyping of tools, combining of existing tools, and the tailoring of applications developed for one purpose but now being reused for this scientific activity. Innovation from this project is applicable to the long-term development of open source software initiatives serving labs throughout the world. The project provides rich, real-world training for graduate students in library and information sciences, training them to be much needed cross-disciplinary researchers in a field desperate for...

somethingbeautiful_cooke

Picture books, such as those in the Marantz Collection (Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science), play an important role in developing literacy in our library users—from traditional literacy (as it relates to reading), to visual literacy, to cultural literacy. Exposing patrons of all ages to the messages contained in children’s literature can have lasting and beneficial effects, and can shape how readers view the world. It is for this reason that it is vitally important to examine the social justice messages that exist in the current literature and to advocate for even more social justice and diversity in the world of picture books. Per her interests in incorporating social justice into LIS pedagogy, Cooke will look for the messages contained in the texts (e.g...

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From 1970-1972 the Graduate School of Library Science at the University of Illinois (now the School of Information Sciences) welcomed and educated twenty-eight students of color known as The Carnegie Scholars. Spearheaded by faculty member Dr. Terry Crowley, he described the Carnegie Scholars program as “an unusual, flawed, but ultimately successful program to increase the number of disadvantaged students, primarily black and Hispanic” in the profession. Students recruited to this program went on to become successful leaders in the field of library and information science (LIS) and in the corporate and government sectors.

The Carnegie program, funded by the Carnegie Corporation in New York and the United States Department of Education, was a direct outgrowth of the momentum and...

IN THE NEWS

May. 11, 2017
Photo by Jewel Armstrong Player

Thirty minority students were recruited in the early 1970s to attend the Graduate School of Library and Information Sciences (now the School of Information Sciences) at the University of Illinois. Called the Carnegie Scholars, all but one of the black and Latino students graduated, and they went on to successful careers in and out of the library profession.

The program was an outgrowth of Project 500, the University of Illinois' 1968 initiative to increase the number of black students enrolled and increase the diversity of the campus. Like that program, the Carnegie Scholars suffered from discrimination, low expectations and a lack of support, writes Assistant Professor Nicole A. Cooke in a recently published article.

Cooke reviewed the history of the Carnegie Scholars program in her article, "The GSLS Carnegie...

May. 5, 2017

Professor Emeritus Chip Bruce will return to the iSchool this summer to teach Inquiry-based Learning (LIS 590IBL). In this online course, students will examine the nature of inquiry and inquiry-based learning, engage in inquiry-based learning, and consider obstacles to learning, including those related to management, assessment, basic skills, cultural differences, and pedagogical goals.

"The course is recommended for community informatics and writing studies but should be of interest in other programs as well," Bruce said. "One aspect that's been especially useful in past semesters is to have students bring their own experiences and questions from fields such as library youth services, art education, kinesiology, technology-enhanced learning, computer-mediated communication, philosophy, and other areas."

He plans to share some of his own experiences, including a two-month trip to Nepal last fall, where he worked with local people on building a progressive education...

Apr. 12, 2017

Assistant Professor Rachel Magee has been named an American Library Association (ALA)-Google Ready to Code (RtC) Faculty Fellow. As an RtC Fellow, she will participate in Phase II of the Libraries Ready to Code project, which ALA and Google launched in January 2017 to help equip librarians with the right skills and tools to encourage kids to code. 

Magee and her five RtC Fellow cohorts will collaborate to redesign one of their courses to integrate Ready to Code ideas. After piloting their new courses this fall, they will share their revised syllabi and course models with library and information science colleagues at other institutions.

"For the fellowship, I'll be working on redesigning the syllabus for Youth Services Community Engagement (LIS 490YSL) to include coding and computational thinking concepts. The new version of the course will be offered in Fall 2017 through the Leep online learning...

Feb. 21, 2017

iSchool staff and students will participate in the 12th International Digital Curation Conference (IDCC), which will be held on February 20-23 in Edinburgh, Scotland. IDCC is organized annually by the UK-based Digital Curation Centre and provides opportunities for educators and professionals to consider digital curation in a multidisciplinary context. The theme of this year's conference is "Upstream, Downstream: embedding digital curation workflows for data science, scholarship and society."
  
iSchool presentations include:

"When Scientists Become Social Scientists: How Citizen Science Projects Learn About Volunteers," a paper authored by iSchool Assistant Professor Peter Darch.

"Revealing the Detailed Lineage of Script Outputs using Hybrid Provenance," a paper authored by iSchool postdoctoral research associates Qian Zhang and Yang Cao and Professor Bertram Ludäscher, director of...

Feb. 16, 2017
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A book edited by Assistant Professor Nicole A. Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney (PhD '13) has been published by Litwin Books/Library Juice Press. Teaching for Justice: Implementing Social Justice in the LIS Classroom is the first in the publisher’s series on critical race studies and multiculturalism in library and information science. Chapter contributors include iSchool alumni Bharat Mehra (PhD '04), Vandana Singh (PhD '08), and Sarah Park Dahlen (PhD '09). The book is based on a workshop organized by Cooke and Sweeney for the 2015 ALISE annual conference.

Publisher's Description: Teaching for Justice highlights the commitment and efforts of LIS faculty and instructors who feature social justice theory and strategies in their courses and classroom practices. This book is geared towards LIS instructors who have begun to incorporate social justice into their course content, as well as those who are interested in learning more about how to address social justice in their...

Feb. 13, 2017

Master's students Jessica Colbert and Daniel Mills will be presenting workshops on behalf of the iSchool Queer Library Alliance at the 2017 Midwest Bisexual, Lesbian, Gay, Trans, and Ally College Conference (MBLGTACC 2017), which will be held February 17-19 at Navy Pier in Chicago. "United in Solidarity" is the theme of this year's conference, which marks the 25th anniversary of the MBLGTACC. 

Colbert and Mills will present a workshop designed to educate LGBT college students about online privacy inspired by the Library Freedom Project:

Library Freedom Project is a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to address the problems of surveillance by making real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries....

Jan. 31, 2017

iSchool Career Services is hosting a special series of Job Search Month events throughout February. In addition to the services offered during the year—including one-on-one consultations, job search assistance, and interview prep—Career Services has a full schedule of activities for students starting their job search, including training on helpful resources and job interview techniques, online chats featuring professionals in various careers, and a site visit to Yahoo! at the University of Illinois Research Park. 

"We developed the first-ever Job Search Month in February of 2016 to help students get a jump start on their job search," said Becky Hodson, career services coordinator.

"Based on the positive student feedback we received, we decided to bring back many of the same programs such as the 'Job Search Quick Chat' series, the Chicago Field Trip/Networking event, and the resume review service we are now calling 'Critique Week.' This year we...

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