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RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS

appgapii
Institute of Museum and Library Services

The focus of this three-year, multisite project is development of app-based curricula and tools for use in school and public libraries. These tools will teach children aged eight to twelve how to build their own apps, providing them with early programming experience, and allow them to share their creations with other children. The project further establishes libraries as places to engage youth in STEM exploration and digital development that reflects their own experiences.

This project builds on a project conducted with support from a planning-phase grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services titled, "Closing the App Gap." 

“The App Authors project is an exciting expansion...

childrecomicsprint
University of Illinois Research Board

This project expands Tilley’s investigation of comics from the perspective of readers, a much-neglected group in both contemporary and historical research. Comics readership among young people peaked in the mid-twentieth century with levels reaching near 100%, yet there has been little scholarly investigation of this phenomenon. Funding for this project will enable archival research trips and hourly research support to complete data collection necessary for a single-author monograph that will provide a coherent examination of the social and cultural role of comics in United States’s children’s print culture throughout the twentieth century.

mapping_info_access

Mapping Information Access is a collaborative academic research project to study and understand the landscape of information access and availability in public schools and libraries in the United States.

There are more than 18,000 public school districts and more than 9,000 public library systems in the US. Each of these institutions is as a central node of information access for the communities they serve. Administrators must balance ideals of free speech and information with concerns about social norms, age-appropriateness, and budgets. These decisions then shape the flow of information to students, patrons, and other constituents. Yet the contours of this flow are not well understood. There exists no comprehensive record of the sorts of challenges faced, or decisions made,...

mechanicalliteracies

This project examines writers who represent education as an embodied experience, with learning and literacy grounded in what they called “object learning” or “the education of things.” Denouncing rote-learning in favor of an induction method, object lessons promised to coordinate the development of body and mind by using the pupil’s senses as a catalyst for higher cognitive thought. Children place themselves above the elements composing their environment, which they control through what Hoiem calls “mechanical literacy”—that is, by learning the dependable laws governing how things are sensed, manipulated, created, purchased, manufactured, and exchanged. The project mobilizes a uniquely diverse archive of material and print cultures—pedagogical treatises, radical newspapers, automaton...

somethingbeautiful_cooke

Picture books, such as those in the Marantz Collection (Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science), play an important role in developing literacy in our library users—from traditional literacy (as it relates to reading), to visual literacy, to cultural literacy. Exposing patrons of all ages to the messages contained in children’s literature can have lasting and beneficial effects, and can shape how readers view the world. It is for this reason that it is vitally important to examine the social justice messages that exist in the current literature and to advocate for even more social justice and diversity in the world of picture books. Per her interests in incorporating social justice into LIS pedagogy, Cooke will look for the messages contained in the texts (e.g...

IN THE NEWS

Aug. 2, 2018

The Indianapolis Children’s Museum has invited the iSchool for an “Intern Day” visit on Thursday, October 4th to share information about and opportunities in the museum. It’s the largest children’s museum in the world with a 482,950 square-foot campus situated on 29 acres, a 130,000+ object collection, and more than 1.2 million visitors a year. Additionally, there is a public library inside the museum so it should make for an interesting visit.

Transportation to and from Indianapolis will be provided for a small fee ($25). We will leave the iSchool at 7:30 a.m. Registration information will be posted soon, so please check back.

Aug. 1, 2018
kyungwonkoh_0

The iSchool is pleased to announce that Kyungwon Koh will join the faculty in August 2018. She is currently an associate professor in the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Oklahoma.

Koh's areas of expertise include digital youth, the maker movement, learning and community engagement through libraries, human information behavior, and competencies for information professionals. 

"Research on contemporary youth, who were born into and have grown up in this technology-rich society, is significant to all information science and technology researchers and practitioners," she said. "Today's young people reflect most explicitly the changes in the current information environment with the rapid developments in technology. This generation's preferences and approaches are...

Jun. 28, 2018
jenkins-lgbtbook

Associate Professor Emerita Christine A. Jenkins and Michael Cart have authored a new comprehensive history of young adult literature featuring LGBTQ+ themes. Their book, Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature: LGBTQ+ Content Since 1969, was recently published by Rowman & Littlefield. 
 
The book builds on their earlier work, The Heart Has Its Reasons (2006), a historical analysis of the early years of young adult (YA) fiction with LGBTQ+ content, a text that was included on VOYA’s Five-Foot Bookshelf of Essential Reading for Professionals Who Serve Teens. 

Jenkins and Cart's new title provides an overview of this rapidly expanding body of literature within the context of the young adult (YA) literary landscape.  In addition to a decade-by-decade analysis of YA...

Jun. 27, 2018

Assistant Professor Elizabeth Hoiem will present her research on nineteenth-century children's nonfiction at the Children's Literature Association conference (ChLA 2018), which will be held on June 28-30 in San Antonio, Texas. The theme of the conference, "Refreshing Waters/Turbulent Waters" explores how water is central to children's and young adult literature as a motif and metaphor. 

In her talk, "A Child-Centered Universe: Growth and Development in Nineteenth-Century Children's Nonfiction," she will discuss how children's nonfiction organized knowledge spatially and cognitively in relation to its young readers, making it child-centered. According to Hoiem, books from the nineteenth century established the formula of outward exploration, inward reflection.

"By depicting which children learn, create, and teach new knowledge, children's nonfiction became a site for negotiating information and power. Over the century, the power to move outward became increasingly...

Jun. 15, 2018

Deborah Stevenson, director of The Center for Children's Books at the iSchool, will present the App Authors research project at the Border-Crossing in Children’s Literature: The Second International Symposium for Children's Literature, which will be held on June 14-15 at Princeton University. The symposium will facilitate an exchange of ideas on new issues in children’s literature research between scholars from the East and West.

Stevenson, who is a principal investigator on the App Authors project with Associate Professor Kate McDowell, will give the talk, "App Authors: Coding Outside the Educational Box." She will discuss how the three-year project, App Authors: Closing the App Gap II, has developed a curriculum for use in school and public libraries that...

Jun. 12, 2018

Please join us at this professional networking event to connect those who support the work of youth librarianship and school libraries. You'll have the chance to meet educators from across the country who are in town for the 2018 Summer Getaway: Professional Development for School Librarians along with regional librarians and educators. The iSchool will provide tasty snacks and the venue will have a cash bar for your convenience. 

Please register online at go.illinois.edu/qualityk12 so we can be sure to bring enough snacks for all.

Apr. 20, 2018
magee-sq

Assistant Professor Rachel M. Magee has been awarded a three-year Early Career Development grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS grant RE-07-18-0054-18), under the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program, which supports "developing a diverse workforce of librarians to better meet the changing learning and information needs of the American public by enhancing the training and professional development of librarians, developing faculty and library leaders, and recruiting and educating the next generation of librarians."

The IMLS-funded project, "Young Researchers: Collaborating with Youth and Libraries for Community Based Scholarship," builds on a pilot study Magee conducted in 2016-2017, in which a small group of teens in Illinois learned how to help design, implement, analyze, and report on original research.

"Working with teens in the pilot study for the...

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