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Jul. 19, 2017
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The Institute of Contemporary Art's "artful book club," ICA Reads, has selected Kindred: A Graphic Novel Adaptation, as its 2017 pick for a book of critical and societal importance. This reinterpretation of Octavia E. Butler's science-fiction masterpiece, Kindred, was adapted by iSchool alumnus and adjunct lecturer Damian Duffy (MS '08, PhD '16) and illustrated by John Jennings. A New York Times bestseller, the novel tells the story of a young black woman's time-travel between her home in 1970s California and a plantation in the antebellum South.

Self-described as "huge Octavia Butler fans," Duffy and Jennings answered a call for entries for an earlier attempt to adapt the novel in 2009 but didn't get the job. By chance, that adaptation fell through, and they were offered the project again in 2012. Duffy...

Jul. 11, 2017

Two iSchool faculty members have articles published in the July 2017 edition of The Library Quarterly. The subject of the edition is "Aftermath: Libraries, Democracy, and the 2016 Presidential Election, Part 1."

In her article, "Posttruth, Truthiness, and Alternative Facts: Information Behavior and Critical Information Consumption for a New Age," Nicole A. Cooke, assistant professor and MS/LIS program director, addresses the phenomenon of fake news. In the months leading up to the 2016 presidential election, and now postelection, increasing attention has been paid to fake news. According to Cooke, "Fake news is not new, nor are its relatives: hoaxes, satire, algorithmic biases, and propaganda. It just has an alarming new patina." In the article, she discusses how critical information evaluation skills can aid in combating the effects of fake news and promote more savvy information consumption.

Jul. 5, 2017
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Nicole A. Cooke, assistant professor and MS/LIS program director, has received two grants from the American Library Association (ALA) for her diversity research. The grants, worth $7,500, include the Carnegie Whitney Award and the ALA Diversity Research Grant. 

She received the Carnegie Whitney Award for her project, "The Interracial Books for Children Bulletin: A Bibliography of Diverse Books." The purpose of the project is to compile a bibliography of the books and media reviewed by the Interracial Books for Children Bulletin. 

"With the goal of addressing LIS practitioners and scholars, children's literature scholars, authors, illustrators, publishers, and multicultural literature aficionados, this resource will be used as a teaching and research tool in classrooms and will aid collection development librarians in diversifying their collections," said Cooke.

Cooke and Miriam E. Sweeney (PhD '13), assistant professor in the School of Library and...

Jun. 30, 2017

Associate Professor Terry Weech and doctoral candidate Aiko Takazawa will discuss their research on the economics of information at the International Conference on Business and Information (BAI), which will be held July 4-6 in Hiroshima, Japan. The conference is an annual meeting for scholars in the business and information disciplines.

Jun. 21, 2017
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Assistant Professor Elizabeth Hoiem will present her research on the representation of slavery in children's nonfiction books at the Children's Literature Association conference (ChLA 2017), which will be held on June 22-24 in Tampa, Florida. The theme of the conference, "Imagined Futures," explores the many possible futures to be found in, through, and for children's literature.

Hoiem will give the talk, "The Politics of How Things Are Made: Representations of Slavery and Violence in Children’s Histories of Technology," during a session titled, "Borders and Frontiers: Explorations of the Past." According to Hoiem, production stories—a genre that includes Amelia Alderson Opie's abolitionist chapbook, The Progress of Sugar (1826); David Macaulay's Cathedral (1973); Laban Carrick Hill and Bryan Collier's Dave the Potter: Artist, Poet,...

Jun. 20, 2017
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Assistant Professor Jodi Schneider will discuss her study of biomedical research reports at the 2nd European Conference on Argumentation, ECA Fribourg 2017, on June 20-23 in Fribourg, Switzerland. The theme of the conference is "Argumentation and Inference." She will also speak at the preconference, "Status, Relevance, and Authority of Facts."
 
Schneider and Sally Jackson, professor of communication at Illinois, are organizing "Innovations in Reasoning and Arguing about Health," a panel that will examine how the complex set of inference practices in the health care profession is changing as people discover better ways to arrive at conclusions about health.

"Inference, or steps in reasoning, is an important part of studying how we make decisions on any topic," said Schneider. "Everyone wants sound reasoning about health—patients, health care providers, public health institutions, medical researchers,...

Jun. 20, 2017
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In Assistant Professor Emily Knox's information policy course (IS 590IP), one of the assignments involves reading about workers in developing countries whose job is to censor objectionable photos posted on social media. The article includes graphic descriptions of some of the photos. Is a trigger warning warranted before assigning the reading to the class?

The use of trigger warnings in college and university classrooms has been a subject of heated debate in recent years. The question of whether an instructor should alert his or her students to the fact that a piece of material they will be reading or viewing in class could be potentially distressing is complex.

Knox takes a comprehensive look at trigger warnings in her edited book, Trigger Warnings: History, Theory, Context, which was recently published by Rowman & Littlefield. The book provides the historical context and theory behind trigger warnings as well as case studies from instructors and students...

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