2010 Research Showcase

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research_showcase_0.pngThe 2010 Research Showcase was held on Friday, April 9, where faculty, Ph.D. students, and scholars from the Graduate School of Library and Information Science presented short talks and posters highlighting their scholarly work. Topics included data curation, text mining, facet analysis, bioinformatics, e-science, organization of information, music information retrieval, youth literature, social networks and media, and community informatics.

The Research Showcase is an annual event open to campus and the general public. 

1:30 - 4:30 p.m.
Friday, April 9, 2010 
501 E. Daniel, Champaign 
East Foyer and Rms. 126 and 131

Presentations (1:30 - 3:30 pm, LIS 126)

Opening Remarks and Introduction
John Unsworth and Carole Palmer 
audio | slides 

Children's Voices in Librarians' Words: Children as Readers in Public Libraries in the United States from 1890-1930 
Kate McDowell 
audio | slides 

Making Sense of Microblog Data 
Miles Efron 
audio | slides 

Multi-Modal Music Mood Classification 
Xiao Hu 
audio | slides 

Collection/Item Metadata Relationships 
Karen Wickett 
audio | slides 

The Data Conservancy: A Model for Research Libraries in the Age of e-Science 
Carole Palmer 
audio | slides 

A Sense of Wonder: Task and Facet Awareness in Aid of Enhanced Folktale Access 
Kathryn La Barre, Carol Tilley 
audio | slides 

Beyond Genes, Proteins, and Abstracts: Identifying Scientific Claims from Full-Text Biomedical Articles 
Catherine Blake 
audio | slides 

MONK in the Library 
John Unsworth 
audio | slides 

Q & A 
audio

Posters (3:30 - 4:30 pm, LIS 131 and E. Foyer)

Automatic Extraction of Location Relations from Text 
Wu Zheng, Catherine Blake 

The Center for Children's Books 
Christine Jenkins 

Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship 
Carole Palmer 

Collection-Level Subject Access: Metadata Application and Use 
Oksana Zavalina 

The Community Informatics Initiative 
Sharon Irish 

Cultural Heritage Information Dashboards 
Richard Urban, Michael Twidale 

"A Cultural Thing:" Three Disciplines Use Three Approaches to Examine Three Books for Young Readers 
Christine Jenkins in collaboration with Karen Coats (Illinois State U); Patricia Enciso (Ohio State U); Shelby Wolf (UC-Boulder) 

eBlackCU: A Collaborative Portal on African-American Experiences in Champaign-Urbana 
Noah Lenstra (CAS) 

The Emergence of Information Organization in Biology 
Dan Wright, Les Gasser 

Enabling Spatial Data Infrastructure Development: Collaboration, Supportive Web Technologies and São Tomé
Jeff Ginger, Sarah Jackman, Yingbo Zhou, Jon Gant 

The First YA Novel, Les Aventures de Télémaque (1699): A Look at the History of Its Translations 
Jenny Schwartzberg (CAS) 

From "Fun See" to "Tien Pao" The Origin of Chinese American Youth Literature 
Minjie Chen 

From the Social to the Individual and Back: The Cognitive Materialist Interpretation of Boundary Objects and Its Implications for Knowledge Organization
Ingbert R. Floyd, Thomas M. Dousa 

Information in Society at GSLIS 
Chris D'Arpa, Adam Kehoe, Caroline Nappo, Safiya Noble, Wilhelm Peekhaus, Jessica Ratcliff, Sarah Roberts, Miriam Sweeney, ShinJoung Yeo 

iPhone Apps and Library Services 
Jim Hahn (CAS) 

Libraries as Bridges across the Digital Divide: Partnerships and Approaches Used in the U.S. Technology Opportunities Program, 1994-2005
Anna Pederson (CAS), Kate Williams 

A Library for Restorative Justice in the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center 
Jeanie Austin, Joe Coyle, Rae-Anne Montague 

Open Government as Democratizing Process: An Examination of the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program
Aaron Fleisher, Kate Williams 

The Reference Interview and the Informatics Moment 
Kate Williams, Aiko Takazawa 

Teacher Learning Networks: a Study of Information Exchange and Innovative Teaching Practice Among Science Teachers 
Wei Gao, Caroline Haythornthwaite

To Keep, or Not To Keep: or Options In Between? 
Hong Zhang, Mike Twidale 

Transforming the Librarians Library: A Case Study of Evidence-Based Librarianship 
Sue Searing 

Translation Stylometry 
Ana Lucic (CAS) 

Verifying the Efficacy and Benefit of Social Tagging: An Analysis of Indexing Consistency and Quality 
Yunseon Choi 

Presentation Abstracts

 

Children's Voices in Librarians' Words: Children as Readers in Public Libraries in the United States from 1890-1930
Kate McDowell
audio | slides

Public librarians documented children's reading choices and activities in surveys and articles published from 1890 to 1930, a period in the United States that coincided with popular interest in childhood, the rise of children's publishing, and the emergence of mass media. This paper seeks to analyze how the history of children as readers is reflected in public children's librarians professional writings. Although historical readers are notoriously difficult to study because their interactions with texts were ephemeral, in professional library literature there are abundant traces of children's reading preferences, choices, and attitudes. However, children's voices were recorded in librarians words and for librarians professional purposes; they were typically quoted to bolster claims of librarians professional efficacy while asserting the need for more children's librarians. The evidence of children's voices that librarians collected must be understood as partial, mediated by adults, and complicated by power relations between children and adults. Even answers to seemingly straightforward queries about favorite books or authors must be read with an awareness of the personal influence librarians cultivated in the relations with children. Interpreting the quantitative survey-based and qualitative anecdotal writings that children's librarians created about the children they served requires careful attention to historical methodology. Qualitative and quantitative data about children's reading must be contextualized in public library settings and in light of children's power relations with adult librarians in order to contribute a meaningful chapter in the history of child readers.

 

Making Sense of Microblog Data
Miles Efron
audio | slides

The increasing use of Twitter.com has pushed so-called microblogging to prominence in both popular and academic arenas. This presentation will discuss research into information management in microblogging environments. Microblogs entail streams of brief textual postings that are often informal and highly abbreviated. While individual posts are rarely interesting to third parties, this presentation will argue that collectively, microblog data can be useful and informative. However, managing microblog text is difficult. Traditional information retrieval methods are hard-pressed to deliver useful results on the these data. This talk will enumerate several challenges that face designers of microblog search systems. The presentation will also highlight ongoing research into theoretical and technical approaches to improving access to microblog information.

 

Multi-Modal Music Mood Classification
Xiao Hu
audio | slides

Music mood is a newly emerged metadata type and access point to music information. However, most existing music digital libraries and online repositories do not support categorizing and retrieving music by the mood it expresses. In fact, music mood, due to its subjectivity, has been far from well studied in information science. This dissertation research aims to 1) find out mood categories that are frequently used by real-world music listeners; 2) advance the technology in automatic music mood classification by combining text analysis and audio processing. The results show that a set of music mood categories can be derived from social tags, and combining lyrics and audio improves classification effectiveness and reduces the requirement on training data, both in size and in audio length. The research pushes forward the state-of-the-art on text sentiment analysis and multi-modal classification in the music domain, the proposed method of building large scale ground truth datasets contributes to the evaluation of music information retrieval tasks, and the research findings will help build better music mood classification and recommendation systems by optimizing the interaction of music audio and lyrics.

 

Collection/Item Metadata Relationships
Karen Wickett
audio | slides

The Collection Item Metadata Relationships project has developed a framework of relationships that can occur between metadata that describes collections and metadata that describes the resources that are members of those collections. In order to examine how these relationships appear "in the wild", we have derived an RDF repository from the IMLS DCC collection repository. By querying the repository, we can see how actual descriptions of collections and items correspond to the framework developed by CIMR and adjust the encoding of relationships within the framework. In this presentation, I will briefly present the motivation and one example category from the CIMR framework and then show how the results of our queries have influenced an adjustment to our framework.

 

The Data Conservancy: A Model for Research Libraries in the Age of e-Science
Carole Palmer
audio | slides

Research libraries are evolving in the age of e-science. They are part of the growing, globally distributed network of digital information and services that supports the conduct of research. In this information landscape, digital data are now recognized as valuable assets research resources that can be aggregated and integrated across multiple scales of size, time, and orders of complexity, and across disciplines to address the grand research challenges facing society. Data curation is central to making this vision a reality. As research libraries take on the responsibility of curating research data, they will need to collaborate with scientists and technologists whose knowledge and expertise are essential in creating large-scale, high performance information systems, where data are shared and linked to the literature. The Data Conservancy (DC) is one of a group of 5-6 NSF DataNet awards being funded to develop a national data network for the sciences. Led by Sayeed Choudhury at Johns Hopkins University Library, DC is an international group of uniquely qualified domain scientists, information and computer scientists, librarians, and engineers that will design and implement an integrated data curation strategy that is a model of future research libraries. The initiative has a broad purview, covering astronomy, biology, earth science, and social science, and working to build a cross-disciplinary infrastructure to address the urgent need to collect, organize, validate, and preserve data to support scientific inquiry. The research conducted at Illinois will contribute to development of a data model for observational data and a general framework for data collection identity and description. Technical development of the DC will also be informed by our research on the differences in data practices and curation requirements across the research communities served by DC.

 

A Sense of Wonder: Task and Facet Awareness in Aid of Enhanced Folktale Access
Kathryn La Barre, Carol Tilley
audio | slides

Discusses the approach taken in Phase 1 of a three-phase project Folktales, Facets and FRBR [funded by a grant from OCLC/ALISE]. This project works with the special collection of folktales at the Center for Children's Books (CCB) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the scholars who use this collection. Describes the information tasks, information seeking obstacles, and desired features for a discovery and access tool related to folktales for this initial group of scholarly users of folktales. Presentation will focus on how awareness of user tasks and domain facets could help enhance access to folktales.

 

Beyond Genes, Proteins, and Abstracts: Identifying Scientific Claims from Full-Text Biomedical Articles
Catherine Blake
audio | slides

Massive increases in electronically available text have spurred a variety of natural language processing methods to automatically identify relationships from text; however, existing annotated collections comprise only bioinformatics (gene-protein) or clinical informatics (treatment-disease) relationships. This paper introduces the Claim Framework that reflects how authors across biomedical spectrum communicate findings in empirical studies. The Framework captures different levels of evidence by differentiating between explicit and implicit claims, and by capturing underspecified claims such as correlations, comparisons, and observations. The results from twenty-nine full-text articles show that authors report fewer than 7.84% of scientific claims in an abstract, thus revealing the urgent need for text mining systems to consider the full text of an article rather than just the abstract. The results also show that authors typically report explicit claims (77.12%) rather than an observations (9.23%), correlations (5.39%), comparisons (5.11%) or implicit claims (2.7%). Informed by the initial manual annotations, we introduce an automated approach that uses syntax and semantics to identify explicit claims automatically and measure the degree to which each feature contributes to the overall precision and recall. Results show that a combination of semantics and syntax is required to achieve the best system performance.

 

MONK in the Library
John Unsworth
audio | slides

The MONK Project (Metadata Offer New Knowledge)has developed a collection of literary texts in English from about 1600-1900, in a variety of genres, from both commercial and public domain sources, totaling 150 million words. Texts have been brought into a uniform XML format, part-of-speech tagged, and ingested into a database, with a user-interface that facilitates statistical analysis of texts and sub-collections. In the current phase of the project, MONK is being brought up as a library service hosted at the University of Illinois Library; it is also the first service to be offered under InCommon, the Shibboleth-based authentication service that all the CIC (Big Ten) Universities have adopted. This presentation will briefly review MONK itself, and then discuss the real-world challenges of next-generation research services in library contexts.

 

Poster Abstracts

 

Automatic Extraction of Location Relations from Text
Wu Zheng, Catherine Blake

The extraction of semantic relations plays an important role in knowledge discovery from text. Identifying relationships automatically can contribute to a variety of natural language processing applications, including information extraction, question answering, knowledge discovery, and information synthesis. The location relation is an interesting case because it spans multiple genres, for example, identifying the geographical location of an organizations head office, the location of a gene within the body, or the location of a city within a country. We present results of experiments that explore the utility of semantics and syntactic constraints to identify location relationships in scientific literature.

 

The Center for Children's Books
Christine Jenkins

The CCB is a crossroads for critical inquiry, professional training, and educational outreach related to youth-focused resources, literature and librarianship. The Center's mission is to facilitate the creation and dissemination of exemplary and progressive research and scholarship related to all aspects of children's and young adult literature; media and resources for young (age 0-18) audiences; and youth services librarianship. In partnership with The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books - an authoritative analytic review journal - the Center aims to inspire and inform adults who connect young people with resources in person, in print, and online. The Center sponsors activities and hosts interdisciplinary research projects involving both theory and practice. In its dual role as research collection and educational community, the Center has national impact on the future of reading and readers.

 

Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship
Carole Palmer

The Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS) at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS) conducts research on information problems that impact scientific and scholarly inquiry. Our projects and activities focus on how digital information can advance the work of scientists and scholars, the curation of research data, and the integration of information within and across disciplines and research communities. CIRSS research areas and their related projects include: Collections & Curation; Digital Collections and Content; Preserving Virtual Worlds; Folktales, Facets and FRBR; Data Curation Education Program e-Science; Data Conservancy; Curation Profiles Project; Data Curation Education Program; Biological Information Specialists; Secondary Reuse of Scientific Data Digital Humanities; Open Annotation Collaboration; Data Curation Education Program Humanities Scholarly Communication & Libraries; Finding Expert Authors in Institutional Repositories; Language and Structure in Scientific Literature; Professional Jurisdiction in Science Informatics; ALA Surveys Other CIRSS programs include: Roundtables; Metadata Roundtable (MDRT); E-Research Roundtable (ERRT) Educational Programs o Specialization in Data Curation; M. S. in Biological Informatics

 

Collection-Level Subject Access: Metadata Application and Use
Oksana Zavalina

Studies of subject access to date have focused primarily on item-level information discovery and access. We still know little about subject access to collection-level information in aggregated digital resources. This dissertation research seeks to answers the question: How does collection-level metadata mediate scholarly subject access to aggregated digital collections? The study includes: comparative content analysis of collection-level metadata in three large-scale aggregations of cultural heritage digital collections: Opening History, American Memory, and The European Library. transaction log analysis of user interactions with Opening History aggregation interview and observation of scholarly users (faculty historians and doctoral candidates in history) using two aggregations: Opening History and American Memory. The results of this research demonstrate that subject-based resource discovery is significantly influenced by collection-level metadata richness. The latter includes such components as 1) the use of different metadata fields with mutually-complementing values for describing collections subject matter and 2) variety of collection properties/characteristics encoded in the free-text Description field. Description and Subjects metadata fields are found to play the most important role in supplying matches to the collection-level user search terms, most of which fall within FRBR concept, object, and/or place categories.

 

The Community Informatics Initiative
Sharon Irish

The CII is a research and teaching center focused on working with communities to address their information and technology needs. Our mission is to address literacy in the internet age, equitable access to the means of digital production, and policy related to communities and information technology. The core of the CII is community inquiry: collaborative action to create knowledge and technology connected to people's values, history, and lived experiences; the development of models of engagement that are just, democratic, participatory, and open-ended; and the integration of theory and practice in an experimental and critical manner.

 

The Emergence of Information Organization in Biology
Dan Wright, Les Gasser

There is a broader view of information organization systems that encompasses biological systems of information (like the genetic code and the immune system) in addition to human-engineered systems. Understanding the evolutionary principles and possible trajectories of all these systems artificial and natural will contribute to our understanding of human designed systems by presenting a much more general picture of the essential features of functional information systems.

 

Cultural Heritage Information Dashboards
Richard Urban, Michael Twidale

Large-scale aggregations of digital collections from libraries, archives and museums offer users unprecedented access to cultural heritage materials. But they also have failed to incorporate important contextual information that allows users to develop an understanding of the significant features of purpose-built collections. This poster (or presentation) explores the development of information dashboard prototypes that provide users a high-level overview of cultural heritage collections. Two case studies using rapid-prototyping methodologies are presented.

 

"A Cultural Thing:" Three Disciplines Use Three Approaches to Examine Three Books for Young Readers
Christine Jenkins in collaboration with Karen Coats (Illinois State U); Patricia Enciso (Ohio State U); Shelby Wolf (UC-Boulder)

In Shaun Tan's Tales of Outer Suburbia (2009), the reader meets Eric, a very small, leaf-like, foreign exchange student who is fascinated by bottle caps, drain holes, and other ephemera of American culture. Eric's host mom attributes his curiosity to a cultural thing. Like Eric, youth literature scholars in one discipline may be fascinated by particular aspects of language, structure, and narrative that are entirely overlooked by colleagues in other disciplines. How do we ever learn from one another, short of being foreign exchange students in one another's departments? Literature for young readers is primarily studied in the fields of English, Education, and Library and Information Science (LIS), but this study is often marked by a lack of conversation among members of these disciplines. Scholars in English and literature tend toward a text-oriented approach that historically excluded the reader from view. Scholars in Education focus on the reader, but may well ignore the insights to be gained from the text being read. And scholars in LIS--a discipline with a long history of scholarship in children's and young adult literature--are often absent from the intellectual worldview of either end of the text-reader continuum, despite the fact that their professional work is located precisely in the intersection between texts and young readers. The proposed poster will both illustrate and challenge the prevailing paradigm using a) an illustrative big picture model illustrating the relationship between the three disciplines, and b) an interdisciplinary examination of three international children's books focusing on immigration experiences.

 

eBlackCU: A Collaborative Portal on African-American Experiences in Champaign-Urbana
Noah Lenstra (CAS)

The documentation of African-American culture and history in Champaign-Urbana is fragmented across multiple archives, libraries, museums, private collections, and in the memories of local citizens. This fragmentation had a certain logic in the analog age, when unpublished information could exist only in one physical spot. However, with digital technology we are able to amalgamate and re-purpose this information to answer new and old questions. In the past issues of ownership have blocked this kind of data sharing. Drawing on the idea of the archival commons, we investigate how digital technology can address the issues of ownership that have aggravated this dispersion. The specific tool driving this project is Omeka. Developed by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University, Omeka brings robust web 2.0 publishing capabilities to institutions with little technical staff and small budgets. The development of eBlackCU will serve as a case-study that can be scaled up to develop eBlackIllinois, a comprehensive digital database of the black experience in Illinois. The eBlack project seeks to put into the hands of everyday individuals the resources necessary not only to conduct research, but also to tell their own stories, share their memories and celebrate their past communally. Working closely with public partners from the Champaign County Historical Archives, Early American Museum, and the Urbana School District, this project will build upon past and present community documentation initiatives, using digital technology to create new ways to bridge the divide between archives and the communities they document.

 

Enabling Spatial Data Infrastructure Development: Collaboration, Supportive Web Technologies and São Tomé
Jeff Ginger, Sarah Jackman, Yingbo Zhou, Jon Gant

This poster presents work done as part of the São Tomé Map Project, a research initiative established in the summer of 2009 as part of the ongoing collaboration between the country of São Tomé and the Community Informatics Initiative (CII), a research and teaching center in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science (GSLIS). The goal of the project is to ensure the people of São Tomé have access to and ownership of relevant local spatial data so they can better make informed decisions and policies governing development of their land, resources and civic infrastructure. Through use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and innovative supportive tools as well as collaboration between key São Tomé locals and an interdisciplinary team of researchers, we intend to not only empower the community to address problems, but develop a process and model of spatial data infrastructure development for future applications in similar settings.

 

The First YA Novel, Les Aventures de Télémaque (1699): A Look at the History of Its Translations
Jenny Schwartzberg (CAS)

This poster will present the history of the publication and translation of the 1699 novel Les Aventures de Télémaque by François de Salignac de la Mothe-Fénelon, Bishop of Cambrai (1651-1715). This novel was written for a twelve-year-old prince, the Duc de Bourgogne, the grandson of Louis XIV, who was expected to eventually inherit the French throne. Both amusing and instructive, after its publication it became a classic of French and European children's literature for two centuries and was translated into twenty-eight languages. The latest translation was a Chinese translation, published in 1995. It is still in print though as a classic of adult literature, not children's literature. The poster will show pictures of exemplar pages and illustrations from various translations and present some of the data I have uncovered so far in my research, as well as an attempt to explain the questions that still remain to be answered and my tentative conclusions about the works reception in European and Anglo-American culture over the following three centuries.

 

From "Fun See" to "Tien Pao" The Origin of Chinese American Youth Literature
Minjie Chen

This paper reports my preliminary finding of a historical study which plans to delineate the long and slow process by which ethnic Chinese people made appearances in literature intended for American young readers from initial caricatures, to fantasy characters, to realistic Chinese people. The historical period of interest is from the first arrival of Chinese laborers in California in the gold rush of 1848 until the eve of the U.S. civil rights movement in the 1960s, when publishers just began to embrace a heightened consciousness in children's books about and for people of color. Recovering the legacy of early titles and pioneer authors will help us gain insight into how contemporary works have negotiated the tradition and burden from the embryonic stage of that literature.

 

From the Social to the Individual and Back: The Cognitive Materialist Interpretation of Boundary Objects and Its Implications for Knowledge Organization
Ingbert R. Floyd, Thomas M. Dousa

Boundary objects (BOs) are an analytic construct used in a number of social-scientific disciplines to model how members of different communities with multiple perspectives can coordinate activities around common objects without ceding their respective understandings of the objects. According to the canonical interpretation, BOs exist at the boundary between 2 communities. These communities are intentionally black-boxed to serve as basic units of analysis. But what happens when we open these black boxes? We find a similar situation going on: BOs exist at the boundary between 2 individuals. We propose cognitive materialism (CM) as a metaphysically conservative model of sociotechnical phenomena that maps individual cognition into social collectives, and social collectives into individual cognition. This approach reveals that inter-community BOs also function as intra-community BOs. CM is applied by identifying natural groupings around adherence to similar conceptions or unproblematic coordinated action among the participants in a study. Standard BO analysis is then applied to both these groupings and to individuals acting within them. A prototypical case for CM is when two people who are communicating think they are talking about the same thing, and then discover that they are not. CM models the sameness and/or difference of beliefs or concepts as follows: Each individual initially assumes his/her interlocutors understanding of the BO is identical to his/her own understanding. If communication about the object is not perceived as problematic, the assumption stays. If communicative disruption occurs, the understanding of the object must be negotiated between those individuals.

 

Information in Society at GSLIS
Chris D'Arpa, Adam Kehoe, Caroline Nappo, Safiya Noble, Wilhelm Peekhaus, Jessica Ratcliff, Sarah Roberts, Miriam Sweeney, ShinJoung Yeo

In 2007, Associate Dean Linda Smith and Professor Dan Schiller were awarded a multi-year grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) to develop the Information in Society concentration at GSLIS. Information in Society is a specialization within the doctoral program that focuses on the societal impacts of information and information technologies with an eye to preparing fellows for research and teaching positions in library and information science programs. Grant funding supports doctoral fellows, post-doctoral fellows, a speaker series, lunch discussions, and conference attendance. Information in Society fellows research is diverse encompassing many aspects of library and information science including biotechnology, library and information history, information policy, community and social informatics, and political economy of information. This poster will provide an overview of the work of current fellows and post docs including research, teaching, conference participation, informal and formal cross-disciplinary discussions, and teaching supported by the IMLS grant. It will highlight individual as well as collective research projects done by fellows and post docs, with implications for the future directions of critical scholarship, research, and pedagogy in library and information science.

 

iPhone Apps and Library Services
Jim Hahn (CAS)

Web based iPhone applications are almost as simple to make as creating a standard website. This poster will show you the step by step process for creating web based applications. The files are created through Dashcode, a freely available software tool included in the iPhone SDK. If you've ever authored a website with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, then you can join the libraries that have iPhone services. This poster will feature screen shots from Dashcode modeling for you the design, file generation and finally, the finished product. No programming experience is required. Best of all, these apps work on the iPod touch. You just need a server to put the files on and a Mac computer to download the SDK to, and you're in business. Example apps: http://www.library.illinois.edu/ugl/about/Experimental_iPhone_Apps/iPhone_apps.html.

 

Libraries as Bridges across the Digital Divide: Partnerships and Approaches Used in the U.S. Technology Opportunities Program, 1994-2005
Anna Pederson (CAS), Kate Williams

As an answer to the digital divide, the U.S. government started a grant program in 1994. Over ten years, the Technologies Opportunities Program (TOP) awarded $230 million to 600 communities to promote network technology and community partnership. The purpose of the poster is to show how libraries used the government funds and community partnerships to close the digital divide in the United States. Of the 600 projects funded by TOP, 25 were library-led: approximately 10 took place in public libraries, three in academic libraries, and 12 in library networks or other settings. This research uses the TOP Data Archive, which we created with the help of others including the U.S. Department of Commerce itself, to examine these 25 projects. We have constructed tables and word clouds to find trends and analyze the projects and partnerships and will use established network analytical methods as well. Interviews with key leaders in each of the projects will help ascertain how each project developed over time. Our governing theory is that social capital and social networks contribute to ICT use. This poster will provide insights and suggestions to libraries that are working on the digital divide or on building partnerships. This topic will be of interest to many people in the library profession, especially those dedicated to serving the public through the use of innovative technology.

 

A Library for Restorative Justice in the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center
Jeanie Austin, Joe Coyle, Rae-Anne Montague

In 2008, juveniles accounted for 16% of all violent crime arrests and 26% of all property crime arrests in the United States (Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, 2009). Nearly 100,000 youth are held in detention facilities on any given day. (OFJJDP, 2009). Often, residents in juvenile detention centers (JDCs) are reading far below their grade level, with the average individual at a ninth-grade level by age but reading at the fourth-grade level (Vacca, 2008). Research has consistently shown that there is a strong link between marginal literacy skills and increased involvement in the justice system (Krezmien and Mulcahy, 2008). Thus, there is a critical need to provide excellent education for youth already in detention settings. Library and Information Science Programs have a unique opportunity to forge partnerships with JDCs to increase the life-chances of incarcerated youth by creating innovative library and literacy programming. This poster and presentation describes a collaboration between Youth Community Informatics at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science and the Champaign County Juvenile Detention Center to create a model for building and maintaining libraries within juvenile detention centers. This project aims to increase the information literacy skills of underserved youth through exposure to library materials, organization, services, and programming. The involvement of Peer Ambassadors, a youth based peer mentoring community organization, builds upon this work by offering library skills training to develop the youth's awareness of critical resources available to them in the community.

 

Open Government as Democratizing Process: An Examination of the BroadBand Technology Opportunities Program
Aaron Fleisher , Kate Williams

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and the Broadband Data Improvement Act of 2009 designated approximately $240 million to implement broadband service in rural and other areas in the form of the BroadBand Technology Opportunities Program (BTOP) and the Broadband Initiatives Program (BIP). These programs' goal represent a major push to install a robust information infrastructure in the United States. The U.S. Government makes claims that BTOP and other programs will be accomplished within a new framework of transparency in governance. The funding of a powerful information infrastructure presents the possibility of promoting greater democracy and equality in an information age by easing access to wider pool of information and making available more powerful digital tools to a greater swath of the population. Research by the Community Informatics Laboratory traced the BTOP/BIP process from its inception. This included recording the initial public comments on the form of the programs, collecting information about the conferences concerning the process, collecting information about the applicants for the BTOP/BIP grants, and collecting information about funded projects as these are announced. That running investigation includes critiquing related governmental transparency. This research and analysis allows the Community Informatics Laboratory to present a picture of current efforts to change how and to whom information flows and begin to make claims about the democratizing power of increased access to information and the opening of new types of communication lines from individuals to the government.

 

The Reference Interview and the Informatics Moment
Kate Williams, Aiko Takazawa

We are completing a pilot study of how Chicago Public Library's cybernavigators help patrons use the public access computers and internet. The informatics moment we conceptualize from our observations, surveys, and focus groups can be usefully analyzed relative to the 1960s discovery of the reference interview (Taylor 1968, Question-Negotiation and Information Seeking in Libraries). Up until that time, reference work was thought of as answering questions by knowing a wide range of sources. The paradigm shift proposed by Taylor and others focused on the process of answering questions in a way useful to the patron, and this included interviewing the patron, thus reference interview. This reconceptualization gave rise to a new approach to reference in research, teaching, and practice. We are proposing that a new paradigm is needed to reconceptualize branch librarianship in the digital age, with attendant changes in research, curriculum, and occupational structure or skill set at the branch level. At the GSLIS research showcase, we plan to recapitulate the history of the reference interview concept and share some of our findings regarding todays informatics moment, as we call the helping interaction between patron and cybernavigator at the public access computer. Findings will include summarizing the perspectives of both cybernavigators and branch managers on this question. Similar informatics moments take place at all sorts of public computer centers; so these findings are important for library theory/practice and beyond, especially when $200 million in stimulus dollars is about to start building and bolstering these centers, including libraries.

 

 

Teacher Learning Networks: A Study of Information Exchange and Innovative Teaching practice among science teachers
Wei Gao, Caroline Haythornthwaite

This research explores social processes that lead to the construction and development of learning networks and educational entrepreneurship among science teachers participating in the Entrepreneurial Leadership in Stem Teaching and Learning project (EnLiST). Questions about learning relate to acquiring, practicing, and disseminating knowledge about the teaching of science and innovative practices around science teaching. Using semi-structured interviews, this research explores the following questions: 1.How teachers construct, maintain, and expand their learning networks and what facilitates or impedes this process. 2.How learning happens and what conditions encourage or constrain knowledge transfer and co-construction among school teachers about science teaching and innovation. 3.What local contexts may facilitate or inhibit implementation of new teaching practice. 4.What relations make up learning and how contacts influence learning. Preliminary results suggest that physical co-location affects information exchange: learning happens in serendipitous short encounters or co-location, co-membership on committees. Teachers consider that others willingness to share is important for knowledge exchange and there is a common desire to make new connections and to talk to others. Future research will examine the expansion of the participating teachers learning networks and the diffusion of innovative teaching practices as a result of the teachers participation in the EnLiST project.

 

To Keep, or Not To Keep: or Options In Between?
Hong Zhang, Mike Twidale

With current systems, we are forced to make decisions either to keep or not keep; delete or not delete a file. Unfortunately our opinions about many information items do not easily fit into this binary worldview. As a part of an exploratory study of looking at file organization on personal computers, this paper describes how people deal with this difficulty on their computers. It implies that people need a facility for information items that falls between the categories of keep and not keep.

 

Transforming the Librarians Library: A Case Study of Evidence-Based Librarianship
Sue Searing

At the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign, a system of distributed, departmental libraries has been in place since the 19th century. A separate Library & Information Science (LIS) Library was housed in the Main Library facility from the 1920s until May 2009, when its collections were merged into other libraries. The new model for LIS library services combines a more robust virtual presence with an intensified human presence in the GSLIS building. The changes in LIS library services are part of a much larger initiative to create a more flexible organizational structure for the University Library that recognizes the increasingly interdisciplinary nature of academic inquiry, the critical importance of digital information resources, and the opportunities for collaborative approaches to the provision of library services and collections using information technology. This case study of a change process that is still in progress focuses on the use of evidence about user behavior and needs (both quantitative and qualitative data) to support decision-making and planning. The transformation of the LIS Library demonstrates how a successful transition from a traditional service model to a new one can be grounded in knowledge of the unique needs and customs of the library, university, and population of users. The next step of the process is to develop an assessment strategy that is likewise based on solid evidence. Because the University of Illinois LIS collection is among the best in North America, its fate is relevant to LIS scholars worldwide.

 

Translation Stylometry
Ana Lucic (CAS)

Translation fate of the novels in the public domain is frequently different from the fate of the novels still under copyright. If the novel is still under copyright it can be translated by one translator and published by one publisher. If, however, the novel is in the public domain several translations of the same text in the same language can (and frequently do) exist simultaneously. One example of the latter is the only prose novel by the German romantic poet Rainer Maria Rilkes The Notebooks of Malte Laurids Brigge. The two most recent translations into English that currently exist in distribution channels are Stephen Mitchells translation which was first published in 1982 and Burton Pikes which came out in 2008. This research attempts to answer the question: how different and how similar these two translations are and at the same time identify the prominent style characteristics of each of the renderings. Several methods will be used to try to identify characteristic features and differences of two texts: identification of highly characteristic words in each of the renderings, the analysis of functional and lexical density of the selected passages, as well as the analysis of word relationships that characterize the opening of the novel in each version. The ultimate question this research is grappling with is whether the two translations are only mere copies of the same novel or they are new literary works, and how removed and how faithful the two renderings are to the original text.

 

Verifying the Efficacy and Benefit of Social Tagging: An Analysis of Indexing Consistency and Quality
Yunseon Choi

This study aims to answer whether user-generated metadata labels through social tagging could enhance access to web resources, and whether we could obtain benefit from social tagging. Particularly, this study examines the inter-indexer consistency of social tagging. This study addresses the following research gaps: (1) most indexing consistency research has been conducted with only a small number of professional indexers not users about physical library collection, not web resources; (2) a previous study with numerous indexers has examined indexing consistency only on a limited scope of documents and has not provided deep analysis on tagging consistency and quality; (3) no research has examined the usefulness of social tagging data for developing user-derived labels in web directories; and (4) no research has examined indexing performance on web resources across human expert-indexed web directories. This study investigates a relationship between indexing consistency of social tagging and the subject areas indexed, comparing indexing consistency of social tagging with that among groups of expert indexers. For measuring indexing consistency, it employs the modified Vector-based Inter-indexer Consistency Density (ICD), based on traditional Information Retrieval (IR) Vector Space Model with three different measures: Euclidean metric, dot product, and cosine similarity. This study contributes to research on indexing consistency on various web resources among a number of indexers from various backgrounds. It provides a way of realizing collaborative indexing of web resources by increasing the utilization of social tagging data.