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RELATED RESEARCH PROJECTS

documentary
Ford Foundation

Films are produced, screened and perceived as part of a larger and continuously changing ecosystem that involves multiple stakeholders and themes. This project will measure the impact of social justice documentaries by capturing, modeling and analyzing the map of these stakeholders and themes in a systematic, scalable and analytically rigorous fashion. This solution will result in a validated, re-useable and end-user friendly methodology and technology that practitioners can use to assess the long-term impact of media productions beyond the number of people who have seen a screening or visited a webpage. Moreover, bringing the proposed computational methodology into a real-world application context can serve as a case-study for demonstrating the usability of this cutting-edge solution...

somethingbeautiful_cooke

Picture books, such as those in the Marantz Collection (Kent State University’s School of Library and Information Science), play an important role in developing literacy in our library users—from traditional literacy (as it relates to reading), to visual literacy, to cultural literacy. Exposing patrons of all ages to the messages contained in children’s literature can have lasting and beneficial effects, and can shape how readers view the world. It is for this reason that it is vitally important to examine the social justice messages that exist in the current literature and to advocate for even more social justice and diversity in the world of picture books. Per her interests in incorporating social justice into LIS pedagogy, Cooke will look for the messages contained in the texts (e.g...

carnegie-scholars1970s_0

From 1970-1972 the Graduate School of Library Science at the University of Illinois (now the School of Information Sciences) welcomed and educated twenty-eight students of color known as The Carnegie Scholars. Spearheaded by faculty member Dr. Terry Crowley, he described the Carnegie Scholars program as “an unusual, flawed, but ultimately successful program to increase the number of disadvantaged students, primarily black and Hispanic” in the profession. Students recruited to this program went on to become successful leaders in the field of library and information science (LIS) and in the corporate and government sectors.

The Carnegie program, funded by the Carnegie Corporation in New York and the United States Department of Education, was a direct outgrowth of the momentum and...

IN THE NEWS

May. 1, 2018
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Assistant Professor and MS/LIS Program Director Nicole A. Cooke will give the keynote address at the Northeast Ohio Regional Library System's Critical Conversations Mini-conference, Tolerance is Not Enough: Libraries Respond to Hate, which will be held on May 3 in Twinsburg, Ohio. The interactive event will focus on helping library staff assess their own cultural identities and biases and on looking at how these biases impact service.

Cooke's presentation, and the theme of the conference, are based on the column she wrote for Library Journal, which was among its most popular pieces in 2017. In her talk, "Tolerance is Not Enough: Striving Towards a Critical and Proactive LIS Practice," she will discuss the need for library professionals to celebrate—not just...

Apr. 20, 2018
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The iSchool is hosting a special three-day gathering, INDABA: Conquering Racism, from April 27-29. All are invited, and remote participants can join online. The event will be recorded (VIDEOS NOW AVAILABLE).

The Indaba, which is a Zulu word used in South Africa to describe an important conference or discussion to address a problem, will bring together alumni of color to talk with the iSchool community about their experiences as students, job seekers, and professionals. One of the goals is to develop recommendations for welcoming more African Americans, Latinx, and Native Americans into the School and related professions.

The event will include presentations, panels, and sessions on conquering racism in libraries and other professions as well as culturally responsive pedagogy—what it is, why it matters,...

Apr. 12, 2018
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Assistant Professor and MS/LIS Program Director Nicole A. Cooke will be the keynote speaker at the inaugural Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Research Panel and Luncheon at the University of South Carolina. The event, which is hosted by the University's College of Information and Communications, will be held on April 13.

In her talk, "Acknowledging History in Order to Disrupt it: Unearthing the Segregated History of Library and Information Science," Cooke will discuss examples of segregation in LIS, highlighting her research concerning The Carnegie Scholars, a group of thirty graduate students who attended the University of Illinois in the early 1970s. She will stress the importance of celebrating the success stories of people of color who are changing the profession as well as learning from...

Dec. 14, 2017
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Assistant Professor Elizabeth Massa Hoiem is one of six Illinois faculty members who have been awarded National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowships for 2018. It is the third year in the last four that the Urbana campus has garnered more fellowship awards than any other single institution.

In addition to Hoiem, fellowship recipients include Donna Buchanan, a professor of music; Candice Jenkins, a professor of English; Paul Kapp, a professor of architecture; D. Fairchild Ruggles, a professor of landscape architecture; and Craig Williams, a professor of classics.

"Congratulations to our NEH Fellowship recipients. It is gratifying to see these exceptional scholars recognized for their academic achievements," said Chancellor Robert J. Jones. "These prestigious fellowships are highly competitive, and for Illinois to have six faculty members named NEH fellows this year indicates the excellence of the scholarship in...

Nov. 3, 2017
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Nicole A. Cooke, assistant professor and MS/LIS program director, has received a Provost's Initiative on Teaching Advancement (PITA) grant, worth $7,500, for her proposal, "Inspiring Culturally Responsive Pedagogy." PITA grants support the implementation of teaching innovations and enhancements at the University of Illinois. 

With the PITA grant, Cooke will extend the cultural competence work the iSchool has undertaken in the past few years and continue the work of a previous curriculum audit.

"Culturally responsive pedagogy is a student-centered approach to teaching in which the student, and societal diversity, are recognized and nurtured in an effort to enrich classroom learning—and are used to encourage student achievement and a sense of well-being about the student's cultural place in the world,” said Cooke. "Focusing on culturally responsive pedagogy will facilitate discussion and additional learning about culturally competent course content and provide...

Oct. 9, 2017
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Assistant Professor and MS/LIS Program Director Nicole A. Cooke presented her research on October 3 as part of the Digital Dialogues series at the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH). The series is the signature events program of MITH, a digital humanities center that is jointly supported by the University of Maryland (UMD) College of Arts and Humanities and UMD Libraries.

In her talk, "Acknowledging History in Order to Disrupt it: Unearthing the Segregated History of Library and Information Science," Cooke discussed examples of segregation in LIS,...

Sep. 12, 2017
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Nicole A. Cooke, assistant professor and MS/LIS program director, will present a workshop at the two-day international symposium, Diversity by Design: Reframing Diversity Discourse in Canada, which will be held on September 13-14 in Toronto. The event will bring together institutions of higher education, information and cultural institutions, community partners, and governmental organizations.

The concept of "diversity by design" was introduced in the publication, "Diversity by Design," by Keren Dali, assistant professor in the School of Library and Information Studies at the University of Alberta, and Nadia Caidi, associate professor in the iSchool at the University of Toronto. The symposium will examine the question of why, “despite our best efforts, the state of diversity is not getting better significantly or quickly...

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