Wickett joins iSchool faculty

Karen Wickett

The iSchool is pleased to announce that Karen Wickett (MS '07, PhD '12) will join the faculty in August 2018. She is currently an assistant professor in the School of Information at the University of Texas at Austin.

Wickett's research areas include the conceptual and logical foundations of information organization systems and artifacts. She is most interested in the analysis of common concepts in information systems, such as documents, datasets, digital objects, metadata records, and collections. Her work recognizes the pressing need for logically consistent definitions and descriptions in digital environments. This is especially important as semantic technologies (such as RDF and linked data services) become more commonplace for digital library and curation systems.

Before her faculty appointment at UT Austin, Wickett was a postdoctoral research associate for the iSchool's Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS), where she focused on information modeling and conceptual modeling in data curation. She also served as an iSchool instructor during this time. In addition to her library and information science degrees from Illinois, she holds a bachelor's degree in math from Ohio State University. Prior to pursuing her graduate degrees, she worked in library technical services in California and Ohio.

"I am delighted to be returning to the University of Illinois to join the faculty at the iSchool," Wickett said. "I look forward to collaborating with top-tier researchers and practitioners in metadata, information organization, and data curation. The academic programs, research centers, and faculty at the iSchool are poised to help students become leaders in the information field in librarianship, data stewardship, analytics, and beyond."

"It is terrific to have Karen back with us as a faculty member. She works in areas such as metadata and curation that are now absolutely critical to the successful management and use of information in a wide variety of institutions and communities—and, especially exciting, her work in the conceptual foundations of information systems is advancing our fundamental understanding of information systems and services," said iSchool Dean and Professor Allen Renear.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

iSchool students present their research at Urbana City Council meeting

At the Urbana City Council meeting on May 9, students in the Community Data (IS 594) course presented their research on how communities are reducing gun violence. According to their instructor Chamee Yang, postdoctoral research associate with the iSchool, Community Data Clinic, and Just Infrastructures Initiative, the new course was designed as an experiential learning opportunity with a community engagement component, where students could gain research experience with real-world implications. Throughout the Spring 2022 semester, students worked in groups to explore community-driven approaches to prevent gun violence.

Chamee Yang, Sarah Unruh, and Gowri Balasubramaniam

Dinh defends dissertation

Doctoral candidate Ly Dinh successfully defended her dissertation, "Advances to Network Analysis Theories and Methods for the Understanding of Formal and Emergent Structures in Interpersonal, Corporate/Organizational, and Hazards Response Setting," on May 19.

Ly Dinh

Summer Getaway to focus on media literacy

After a pandemic break, the iSchool is pleased to announce that the seventh annual Summer Getaway will be offered in person on June 10-11. Led by iSchool faculty/instructors/staff and school librarians, this professional development event offers a series of workshops focused on topics related to media literacy.

2022 Summer Getaway-Media Literacy

2021 Downs Intellectual Freedom Awards given to #FReadom Fighters and ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom staff

For libraries and librarians, 2021 was an especially challenging year in terms of the increase in attempts at censorship. According to the American Library Association (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom, the number of challenges to library materials more than tripled from 2020 to 2021. In addition, current estimates show that 82 to 97 percent of challenges go unreported, suggesting that the total number of challenges are significantly greater.

#FReadom Fighter logo

New project to improve health of patients with kidney failure

There are approximately 600,000 individuals in the U.S. who are undergoing hemodialysis (HD) therapy for kidney failure. In hemodialysis, a machine filters wastes, salts, and fluid from the blood when an individual's kidneys are no longer healthy enough to do this work adequately. While lifestyle changes such as getting more exercise and making better nutritional choices would benefit HD patients, they are not popular with patients—leading to poor health outcomes. A new project, led by Assistant Professor Jessie Chin, aims to boost HD patients' commitment to exercise through a long-term motivational interviewing conversational agent (LotMintBot).

Jessie Chin