Jenkins publishes resource on young adult literature with LGBTQ+ themes

Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature: LGBTQ+ Content Since 1969
Christine Jenkins
Christine Jenkins, Associate Professor Emerita

Associate Professor Emerita Christine A. Jenkins and Michael Cart have authored a new comprehensive history of young adult literature featuring LGBTQ+ themes. Their book, Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature: LGBTQ+ Content Since 1969, was recently published by Rowman & Littlefield. 
 
The book builds on their earlier work, The Heart Has Its Reasons (2006), a historical analysis of the early years of young adult (YA) fiction with LGBTQ+ content, a text that was included on VOYA’s Five-Foot Bookshelf of Essential Reading for Professionals Who Serve Teens. 

Jenkins and Cart's new title provides an overview of this rapidly expanding body of literature within the context of the young adult (YA) literary landscape.  In addition to a decade-by-decade analysis of YA fiction, this edition also includes chapters on bisexual, transgender, and intersex issues and characters, as well as chapters on comics, graphic novels, and works of nonfiction. 

According to the publisher, "this volume charts the evolution of YA literature that features characters and themes which resonate not only with LGBTQ+ readers but with their allies as well. In this resource, Jenkins and Cart identify titles that are notable either for their excellence—accurate, thoughtful, and nuanced depictions—or deficiencies—books that are wrongheaded, stereotypical, or outdated.  Encompassing a wide range of gender and sexual identities, Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature is an invaluable resource for young people eager to read about books relevant to them and their lives."
 
Before retiring from the iSchool in 2015, Jenkins taught courses on literature for young adults and children, gendered perspectives in LIS, reading and readers, and the history of children's books. She is the recipient of several teaching awards and has a decade of experience as a school librarian/media specialist. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Research on Children's and Young Adult Literature (2011) and coauthor (with Michael Cart) of Top 250 LGBTQ Books for Teens (2015). She holds a master's and PhD in library and information studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a master's in English/children's literature from Eastern Michigan University.

Tags:
Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

New project to create accessible library makerspaces

Library makerspaces offer community members the opportunity to tinker, design, experiment, and create with a range of technology in an informal learning space. However, because current makerspaces and maker tools are highly vision oriented, blind and visually impaired (BVI) people have limited access to these learning opportunities. A new project led by Assistant Professor JooYoung Seo and Associate Professor Kyungwon Koh, director of the CU Community Fab Lab, seeks to address this problem by creating accessible maker programs for BVI learners and developing training materials for librarians and maker professionals on accessible making. The researchers were recently awarded a three-year $498,638 National Leadership Grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS grant LG-252360-OLS-22) for their project, "Promoting Computational Thinking Skills for Blind and Visually Impaired Teens Through Accessible Library Makerspaces."

New project to explore the use of conversational AI in libraries

Assistant Professor Yun Huang has been awarded a three-year $399,996 Early Career Development grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS grant RE-252329-OLS-22), under the Laura Bush 21st Century Librarian Program, which supports innovative research by untenured, tenure-track faculty.

Yun Huang

iSchool presents research at Digital Humanities 2022

iSchool faculty, staff, and students presented their research at Digital Humanities 2022, the annual conference of the International Alliance of Digital Humanities Organizations. The theme of this year's conference, which was held online on July 25-29, was "Responding to Asian Diversity."

Wang research group presents at international AI conference

Members of Associate Professor Dong Wang's research group, the Social Sensing Lab, presented their research at the 31st International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence and the 25th European Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI-ECAI 2022). The conference, which brings together AI researchers from around the world, was held in Vienna, Austria, from July 23-29.