Jenkins publishes resource on young adult literature with LGBTQ+ themes

Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature: LGBTQ+ Content Since 1969
Christine Jenkins
Christine Jenkins, Associate Professor Emerita

Associate Professor Emerita Christine A. Jenkins and Michael Cart have authored a new comprehensive history of young adult literature featuring LGBTQ+ themes. Their book, Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature: LGBTQ+ Content Since 1969, was recently published by Rowman & Littlefield. 
 
The book builds on their earlier work, The Heart Has Its Reasons (2006), a historical analysis of the early years of young adult (YA) fiction with LGBTQ+ content, a text that was included on VOYA’s Five-Foot Bookshelf of Essential Reading for Professionals Who Serve Teens. 

Jenkins and Cart's new title provides an overview of this rapidly expanding body of literature within the context of the young adult (YA) literary landscape.  In addition to a decade-by-decade analysis of YA fiction, this edition also includes chapters on bisexual, transgender, and intersex issues and characters, as well as chapters on comics, graphic novels, and works of nonfiction. 

According to the publisher, "this volume charts the evolution of YA literature that features characters and themes which resonate not only with LGBTQ+ readers but with their allies as well. In this resource, Jenkins and Cart identify titles that are notable either for their excellence—accurate, thoughtful, and nuanced depictions—or deficiencies—books that are wrongheaded, stereotypical, or outdated.  Encompassing a wide range of gender and sexual identities, Representing the Rainbow in Young Adult Literature is an invaluable resource for young people eager to read about books relevant to them and their lives."
 
Before retiring from the iSchool in 2015, Jenkins taught courses on literature for young adults and children, gendered perspectives in LIS, reading and readers, and the history of children's books. She is the recipient of several teaching awards and has a decade of experience as a school librarian/media specialist. She is coeditor of the Handbook of Research on Children's and Young Adult Literature (2011) and coauthor (with Michael Cart) of Top 250 LGBTQ Books for Teens (2015). She holds a master's and PhD in library and information studies from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a master's in English/children's literature from Eastern Michigan University.

Tags:
Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

iSchool doctoral students win ASIS&T design competition

A team composed of two iSchool PhD students, Ly Dinh and Jessica Cheng, and a PhD student from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Li-Min (Cassandra) Huang, won the ASIS&T 2018 Student Design Competition. The competition was held on November 13 during the ASIS&T Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada.

Dinh & Cheng design team

Mishra wins award for best student paper

Doctoral student Shubhanshu Mishra won the Best Student Paper Award at the Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research (SIG/MET), which was held on November 10 in conjunction with the ASIS&T 2018 Annual Meeting in Vancouver, Canada. Sponsored by Elsevier, the award recognizes achievement in student presentation in the following criteria: design of the study, originality, relevance to the workshop, and adherence to research ethics. 

Downie to deliver keynote at ICADL2018

Professor and Associate Dean for Research J. Stephen Downie will be a keynote speaker for the 20th International Conference on Asia-Pacific Digital Libraries (ICADL2018), which will be held November 19-22 in Hamilton, New Zealand. The theme of this year's conference is "Maturity and Innovation in Digital Libraries."

J. Stephen Downie

Mak discusses the sensorial document in Sydney keynote

Bonnie Mak presented the keynote address at "What is a Document? A Symposium on Documentation, Records, and Evidence," which was held November 8-9 at University Technology Sydney (UTS) in Australia. The event was sponsored by the UTS Faculty of Law and is part of a three-year project funded by the Australian Research Council to examine the document from the perspective of laws of evidence. The symposium featured speakers from institutions across Australia in such diverse fields as government and international relations, design, art history, and law.

Bonnie Mak

Schneider to discuss problem citations at Crossref LIVE18

Assistant Professor Jodi Schneider will present her research at Crossref LIVE18, which will be held November 13-14 in Toronto, Canada. CrossRef is a cooperative membership organization of over 11,000 scholarly publishers from 118 countries.