Wang to discuss inclusive privacy at Facebook headquarters

Yang Wang
Yang Wang, Associate Professor

Associate Professor Yang Wang will present his research on inclusive privacy at Facebook's Digital Literacy & Transparency Design Jam on October 1 at the company's headquarters in Menlo Park, California. Design Jams are interactive workshops organized and facilitated by the Trust, Transparency and Control (TTC) Labs, a cross-industry effort driven by Facebook that hosts research, insights, and prototype design patterns related to improving user experiences for privacy and data. Wang will join a global team of experts from Facebook's Accessibility Team and the TTC Labs in creating innovative designs focused on transparency and control for people with low tech literacy. 

"I'm glad to see that Facebook is trying to make their privacy and security mechanisms more inclusive to a wider range of users, particularly those from marginalized groups," Wang said. "I am happy to share with Facebook and the broader community our experience and lessons learned on this topic from working with people with disabilities."

Wang's research interests include usable privacy and security technologies, social computing, human-computer interaction, and explainable artificial intelligence. His research has received support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Department of Health and Human Services, Google, Alcatel-Lucent, and The Privacy Projects, and has appeared in news outlets such as The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, BBC, and China Daily. Wang's honors include the IAPP SOUPS Privacy Award, NSF CAREER Award, and a Top Privacy Paper for Policy Makers selected by the Future of Privacy Forum. He earned his PhD in information and computer science from the University of California, Irvine.

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