iSchool instructors ranked as excellent

Forty-nine iSchool instructors were named in the University's List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent for Fall 2020. The rankings are released every semester, and results are based on the Instructor and Course Evaluation System (ICES) questionnaire forms maintained by Measurement and Evaluation in the Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning. Only those instructors who gave out ICES forms during the semester and who released their data for publication are included in the list.

Faculty and instructors appearing on the list include Barbara Alvarez, Masooda Bashir, Nigel Bosch, Bobby Bothmann, Emilie Butt, Anita Say Chan, Jessie Chin, Sharon Comstock, Anne Craig, J. Stephen Downie, Karen Egan, Anna Hartmann, Lisa Janicke Hinchliffe, Elizabeth Hoiem, Jeanne Holba-Puacz, David Hopping, Jimi Jones, Halil Kilicoglu, Emily Knox, Ellen Knutson, Kyungwon Koh, Katie Chamberlain Kritikos, Kathryn La Barre, Rachel M. Magee, Bonnie Mak, Kate McDowell, Benjamin Mead-Harvey, Jill Naiman, Caroline Nappo, Melissa Newell, Melissa Ocepek, Judith Pintar, Kate Quealy-Gainer, Madelyn Sanfilippo, Jodi Schneider, Ruth Shasteen, Yoo-Seong Song, Jennifer Hain Teper, Carol Tilley, Tony Torres, Kevin Trainor, Matthew Turk, Michael Twidale, Ted Underwood, John Weible, Karen Wickett, Walter Wilson, Martin Wolske, and Melissa Wong.

Alvarez, Butt, Craig, Downie, Hinchliffe, Koh, La Barre, Naiman, Ocepek, and Wong received the highest ranking of "outstanding."

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