iSchool well represented at ASIS&T 2021

iSchool faculty and students will participate in the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) Annual Meeting, which will be held in a hybrid format—in Salt Lake City, Utah, and online—from October 30-November 2. The theme of this year's conference is "Information: Equity, Diversity, Inclusion, Justice, and Relevance." The meeting, now in its 84th year, is the premier international conference dedicated to the study of information, people, and technology in contemporary society.

Professor Emerita and Interim Executive Associate Dean Linda C. Smith, past president of ASIS&T, has been selected as an ASIS&T Distinguished Member. The new program recognizes "up to ten percent of ASIS&T global membership based on professional experience as well as significant achievements in the information science and technology field through professional service and leadership, and scholarly or professional contributions."

Immediately following the Annual Meeting, Associate Professor Maria Bonn will begin her three-year term on the ASIS&T Board of Directors.

Friday, October 29

Assistant Professor Madelyn Sanfilippo co-organized the 17th Annual Social Informatics Research Symposium and the 3rd Annual Information Ethics and Policy Workshop: Sociotechnical Perspectives on Equity, Inclusion, and Justice, which will be held at 8:00 a.m.

Associate Professor Jana Diesner co-organized the workshop, Social Media Research, Challenges, and Opportunities, which will be held at 9:00 a.m.

Saturday, October 30

Morgan Gray (MS/LIS '21) and Assistant Professor Jodi Schneider will present their poster, "'I Would Have Never Gotten a Diagnosis': Investigating the Information Seeking Needs, Behaviors, and Barriers Faced by Endometriosis Patients," at the SIG-USE Annual Symposium.

Affiliate Professor Clara Chu co-organized the workshop, Artificial Intelligence in Information Research and Practice: Fostering Interconnected Communities, which will be held at 8:00 a.m.

Associate Professor Masooda Bashir co-organized the workshop, Toward a Shared Vision of Privacy Protections in Public Libraries, which will be held at 1:00 p.m.

Doctoral candidates Lo Lee, Ly Dinh, and Jessica Yi-Yun Cheng, and Informatics PhD student Ming Jiang will be participating in the Doctoral Colloquium at 1:00 p.m. Professor Michael Twidale will serve as a faculty mentor.

Sunday, October 31

Assistant Professor Rachel M. Magee will serve as a panelist for the session, Youth Information Interaction Research in the Pandemic: Adjustments, Innovations, Implications, at 4:00 p.m.

Doctoral candidate Ly Dinh will chair the session, Scientometrics and Bibliometrics, at 4:00 p.m.

Monday, November 1

Doctoral candidate Jessica Yi-Yun Cheng will chair the session, Research Data Management, at 8:00 a.m.

Professor Catherine Blake and Informatics PhD student Donald Keefer will present their paper, "The Reproducible Data Reuse (ReDaR) Framework to Capture and Assess Multiple Data Streams," at 8:30 a.m.

Associate Professor Emily Knox will serve as a panelist for the session, Information Injustice and Intellectual Freedom: Polarizing Concepts for a Polarizing Time, at 10:00 a.m.

Posters presented during the President’s Reception at 6:00 p.m. include:

  • Assistant Professor Madelyn Sanfilippo and MS/IM student Alex Rosenberger, "Digital Contact Tracing in the EU: Data Subject Rights and Conflicting Privacy Governance"
  • PhD student Chenyue Jiao, "A Survey of Exclusively Data Journals and How They are Indexed by Scientific Databases"
  • Doctoral candidate Ruohua Han and PhD student Yingying Han, "Radical Empathy in the University Archives: Examining Archival Representations of Chinese Students from 1906 to 1925"
  • Doctoral candidate Jessica Yi-Yun Cheng, "Systematic Comparison of Data Models Used in Mapping Knowledge Organization Systems"

Tuesday, November 2

Associate Professor Masooda Bashir and Informatics PhD students Tian Wang and Lin Guo will present their paper, "COVID-19 Apps and Privacy Protections from Users' Perspective," at 9:30 a.m.

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