iSchool participation in iConference 2022

The following iSchool faculty, staff, and students will participate in iConference 2022, which will be held virtually on February 28-March 4. The annual event brings together scholars, researchers, and information professionals to share insights on critical information issues. The theme of this year's conference is "Information for a Better World: Shaping the Global Future."

Monday, February 28

Associate Professor Kate McDowell will present at the interactive event, "Storytelling and Qualitative Information Research," at 2:00 p.m.

PhD student Yuerong Hu and doctoral candidate Qiuyan Guo will participate in the Doctoral Colloquium (Americas session), at 3:00 p.m.

Tuesday, March 1

Teaching Assistant Professor Inkyung Choi will participate in the Early Career Colloquium at 10:00 a.m.

Assistant Professor Jodi Schneider and high school students Amulya Addepalli and Karen Ann Subin will present their paper, "Testing the Keystone Framework by Analyzing Positive Citations to Wakefield’s 1998 Paper," at 11:30 a.m. The paper is a finalist for Best Short Research Paper.

Wednesday, March 2

Associate Professor Maria Bonn and Associate Professor Emily Knox will present at the interactive event, "LIS Forward Forum: Shaping Future Directions for LIS to Thrive and Grow in iSchools," at 11:00 a.m.

Assistant Professor Melissa Ocepek and doctoral candidate Lo Lee will present their paper, "Perceiving Libraries in a Making Context: Voices of Arts and Crafts Hobbyists," at 2:00 p.m.

Thursday, March 3

Professor and HTRC Co-Director J. Stephen Downie, HTRC Associate Director for Research Support Services Glen Layne-Worthey, and doctoral candidate Nikolaus Nova Parulian will present their paper, "An Ensemble Framework for Dynamic Character Relationship Sentiment in Fiction," at 11:30 a.m.

Doctoral candidate Qiuyan Guo will present her poster, "Chinese Celebrity Fans' Information Creating Behaviors on the Weibo Platform," at 3:00 p.m.

Friday, March 4

Affiliate Professor Clara Chu will present at the interactive event, "AI Education in iSchools: Reshaping the Curricula for an Equitable and Inclusive Information Landscape," at 1:00 p.m.

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