Knox and LaRue speak at intellectual freedom forum

Emily Knox
Emily Knox, Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Emily Knox and iSchool alumnus James LaRue (MS '81), director of the American Library Association's (ALA's) Office for Intellectual Freedom and the Freedom to Read Foundation, will serve as panelists for a special forum on March 5 at the University of Oregon. The event is part of the University's 2018 event series, which aims to address challenging, contemporary issues of free expression on college campuses.

Knox and LaRue will be joined by Jody Gray, director of the ALA's Office of Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach. Their panel discussion, Allies Not Enemies: Intellectual Freedom and Social Justice, will examine the complex issues involved at the intersection of values and real-world situations and will explore how educators and library professionals can promote and protect human rights in their communities.

"The perspectives of the panelists will, no doubt, enrich the conversation about freedom of expression," said Adriene Lim, dean of libraries and Philip H. Knight Chair at the University of Oregon. "For librarians, our focus on intellectual freedom and on the Library Bill of Rights has meant that we are on guard against any ideological bias or censorship in our work, even as we also cherish our values of diversity, democracy, and social justice. We know that to achieve intellectual freedom, the voices and histories of people who have been oppressed or marginalized need to be made accessible and preserved in the record."

Knox joined the iSchool faculty in 2012. Her research interests include intellectual freedom and censorship, the intersection of print culture and reading practices, and information ethics and policy. She recently edited Trigger Warnings: History, Theory, Context (2017), published by Rowman & Littlefield. Her previous book, Book Banning in 21st-Century America, also published by Rowman & Littlefield (2015), addresses challenges to materials in public libraries and schools. Knox serves on the boards of the Association for Information Science & Technology (ASIS&T), Freedom to Read Foundation, and National Coalition Against Censorship.

LaRue is the author of The New Inquisition: Understanding and Managing Intellectual Freedom Challenges (Libraries Unlimited, 2007). He was a public library director for many years, as well as a weekly newspaper columnist and cable TV host.  He has written, spoken, and consulted on leadership and organizational development, community engagement, and the future of libraries.

Research Areas:
Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Experience trailers offer a flavor of the user experience

When Nintendo introduced the Wii home video game console in 2006, the company needed to show the general public how the Wii was unlike other game consoles currently on the market. To do so, Nintendo created an experience trailer to help potential users understand how it would feel to use the Wii. Professor and MS/IM Program Director Michael Twidale and Stefan Rennick-Egglestone, a senior research fellow in the School of Health Sciences at the University of Nottingham, discuss this area of research in their article, "Experience Trailers."

Cheng to discuss classification systems at international workshop

Doctoral student Jessica Cheng will present her research at the 18th European Knowledge Organization Systems (NKOS) Workshop, which will take place on September 13 in Porto, Portugal. The workshop, held in conjunction with the International Conference on Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries (TPDL 2018) and the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative (DCMI 2018), will explore the potential of knowledge organization systems (KOS) such as classification systems, taxonomies, thesauri, ontologies, and lexical databases in the context of current developments and possibilities.

Jett presents at digital humanities conference

Doctoral candidate Jacob Jett presented his research in digital cultural heritage collections at the Japanese Association for the Digital Humanities annual conference (JADH 2018), which was held September 9-11, in Tokyo, Japan. The theme of this year's conference was "Leveraging Open Data."

New book 'beginning' of New Philadelphia story

Professor Emeritus Gerald McWorter (Abdul Alkalimat) and Associate Professor Kate Williams have coauthored a book on New Philadelphia, the first known town planned and legally registered in the U.S. by an African American, Gerald's great-great-grandfather, Free Frank McWorter.

New Philadelphia book cover

Diesner to deliver keynote at HNR 2018

Associate Professor and PhD Program Director Jana Diesner will serve as a keynote speaker for the fifth annual Historical Network Research Conference (HNR 2018), which will be held from September 11-13 in Brno, the Czech Republic. The conference brings together historians, social scientists, and computer scientists to foster awareness of the possibilities of network research and create opportunities for sharing cross- and multidisciplinary approaches to the networked past.

Assistant Professor Jana Diesner