Ludäscher Lab to present research at Philadelphia Logic Week

Bertram Ludäscher
Bertram Ludäscher, Professor and Director, Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship
Jessica Yi-Yun Cheng
Jessica Yi-Yun Cheng

Professor Bertram Ludäscher will be presenting research with group members during Philadelphia Logic Week 2019. The event, which will be held from June 3-7 at St. Joseph's University, brings together several conferences dedicated to the research on logic, knowledge representation, reasoning, transformations and provenance: the 15th International Conference on Logic Programming and Nonmonotonic Reasoning (LPNMR 2019), the 3rd International Workshop on the Resurgence of Datalog in Academia and Industry (Datalog 2.0), the 8th International Workshop on Bidirectional Transformations (Bx 2019), and the 11th International Workshop on Theory and Practice of Provenance (TAPP 2019).

On June 3, Ludäscher will present the poster, "Modeling Provenance and Understanding Reproducibility for OpenRefine Data-Cleaning Workflows," at TaPP 2019, describing ongoing work with Dr. Timothy McPhillips, scientist and software developer, and PhD students Lan Li and Nikolaus Parulian. OpenRefine is a popular tool for exploring, profiling, and cleaning datasets using a spreadsheet-like interface. In their poster, the researchers will report early results from an investigation into how records captured by OpenRefine can facilitate reproduction of complete, real-world data cleaning workflows as well as support queries and visualizations of the provenance of cleaned datasets.

Computer Science undergraduate Sahil Gupta, PhD student Jessica Cheng, and Ludäscher will present their paper, "Possible Worlds Explorer: Datalog & Answer Set Programming for the Rest of Us," on June 4 at Datalog 2.0. The paper examines Possible Worlds Explorer (PWE), an open source Python-based toolkit that runs in an interactive Jupyter environment, which the researchers developed to make working with Datalog and Answer Set Programming Systems (ASP) easier and more productive. According to the researchers, "PWE and tools like it may play an increasing role in future data science and AI applications by combining declarative problem solving in the style of ASP and Datalog with tool integration and information visualization through Python."

Ludäscher, director of the iSchool's Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS), explains, "At first sight, it may seem that reproducible and transparent data cleaning with OpenRefine on one hand, and declarative problem solving through ASP and Python on the other, have little to do with one another. However, both topics are closely related through a common underlying information science foundation: both lines of research combine conceptual modeling and computational thinking into a new kind of declarative data wrangling and analysis, using rule-based logic languages."

Ludäscher is a leading figure in data and knowledge management, focusing on the modeling, design, and optimization of scientific workflows, provenance, data integration, and knowledge representation. He is a faculty affiliate at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and the Department of Computer Science at Illinois. He studied computer science at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and received his PhD in computer science from the University of Freiburg.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Get to know Lynn Lawrence-Brown, MS/LIS student

When she isn't taking classes through the iSchool's Leep (online) program or working part time in the library at Hong Kong Academy, Lynn Lawrence-Brown is writing book reviews (including this review of a book by renowned children's poet Janet Wong) and blogging for We Need Diverse Books. Last month she completed a discussion guide for an upcoming middle-grade novel, The Not-So-Uniform Life of Holly-Mei by Christina Matula. Lawrence-Brown, a Taiwanese American who grew up in Maine but now lives in Hong Kong, wants to continue "doing work that helps promote diverse books and writers of color and help put diverse books in the hands of readers of all ages."

Lynn Lawrence-Brown

HathiTrust Research Center receives NEH support for open research tools

The HathiTrust Research Center (HTRC), cohosted by the iSchool at Illinois and the Luddy School of Informatics at Indiana University, has received a $325,000 Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities. One of 15 awarded nationwide, this grant will support the development of a new set of visualizations, analytical tools, and infrastructure to enable users to interact more directly with the rich data extracted from the HathiTrust Digital Library’s collection of more than 17.5 million digitized volumes.

HathiTrust Research Center

He receives grant to improve performance of deep learning models

Associate Professor Jingrui He has been awarded a two-year, $149,921 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to improve the performance of deep learning models. For her project, "Weakly Supervised Graph Neural Networks," she will focus on the lack of labeled data in Graph Neural Networks (GNNs), a deep learning method designed to perform inference on data described by graphs.

Jingrui He

Flexible program, extracurriculars lead to a rewarding student experience

MS/IM student Aradhya Seth is enjoying his time at the U of I, exploring campus, attending Trivia Tuesdays and karaoke at the Illini Union, and doing stand-up comedy. As an iSchool Ambassador, he gets the opportunity to share his experiences of student life at the iSchool and Illinois with prospective students.

Aradhya Seth on campus

Cora Thomassen, former faculty member, passes away

Cora Thomassen passed away on December 23, 2021. Thomassen earned her MS/LIS degree from the University of Illinois in 1955. She became the librarian at South Haven, Michigan, public schools, and then librarian to an extension of Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. In 1961, she accepted an assistant professor of library science position at the U of I, becoming a tenured associate professor in 1969.

Cora Thomassen