Book chapter coauthored by Knox discusses FOI requests

Emily Knox
Emily Knox, Associate Professor and Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

Associate Professor and BS/IS Program Director Emily Knox has coauthored a chapter in the book Freedom of Information and Social Science Research Design, which is being published by Routledge this month. Edited by Kevin Walby and Alex Luscombe, the book demonstrates how Freedom of Information (FOI) law and processes can contribute to social science research design across sociology, criminology, political science, anthropology, journalism, and education.

The chapter Knox coauthored with Shannon M. Oltmann (University of Kentucky) and Chris Peterson (MIT), "Designing Research Using FOI Requests in the USA," describes the ways in which FOI can be used as a research tool, how to design FOI-based research projects, and how to conduct FOI requests in the U.S. at both the state and federal levels.

According to the researchers, "There are several key factors to consider in using FOI requests as a research method, but perhaps the most important is a longer time frame, allowing government agencies sufficient time to gather and send the requested information. Attention to the details in a FOI request can facilitate a more rapid response; thus, it is particularly important to submit detailed and accurate FOI requests."

Knox's research interests include information access, intellectual freedom and censorship, information ethics, information policy, and the intersection of print culture and reading practices. At the iSchool, she teaches a course on intellectual freedom and censorship and a course on information ethics. Knox's books include Book Banning in 21st Century America; Document Delivery and Interlibrary Loan on a Shoestring; Trigger Warnings: History, Theory, Context; and Foundations of Information Ethics, which she co-edited with John T. F. Burgess.

Knox received her PhD from the School of Communication and Information at Rutgers University and her MS from the iSchool at Illinois. She also holds a BA in religious studies from Smith College and an AM in the same field from The University of Chicago Divinity School.

Research Areas:
Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Cordell to deliver keynote on Viral Texts project

Associate Professor Ryan Cordell will deliver the keynote address at the Marbach-Weimar-Wolfenbüttel (MWW) Research Association Mid-Term Conference, which will be held virtually from Germany on October 14-15. The goal of the MWW is "to provide future-oriented impulses for collaboration in the field of humanities and cultural studies research." The association's mid-term conference will focus on engagement with material and medial losses in the archive and library.

Ryan Cordell

New journal article examines vaccination misinformation on social media

Research conducted by Assistant Professor Jessie Chin's Adaptive Cognition and Interaction Design Lab (ACTION) provided the foundation for an article recently published in the high-impact Journal of Medical Internet Research. PhD student Tre Tomaszewski is the first author on the peer-reviewed article, "Identifying False Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Information and Corresponding Risk Perceptions from Twitter: Advanced Predictive Models."

Tre Tomaszewski

iSchool instructors ranked as excellent for Summer 2021

Nine iSchool instructors were named in the University's List of Teachers Ranked as Excellent for Summer 2021. The rankings are released every semester, and results are based on the Instructor and Course Evaluation System (ICES) questionnaire forms maintained by Measurement and Evaluation in the Center for Innovation in Teaching and Learning. Only those instructors who gave out ICES forms during the semester and who released their data for publication are included in the list.

iSchool Building

Schwebel edits book on Newbery Medal books

Sara L. Schwebel, professor and director of the Center for Children's Books, and Jocelyn Van Tuyl, professor of French at New College of Florida, have coedited a new book, Dust Off the Gold Medal: Rediscovering Children's Literature at the Newbery Centennial, which was recently published by Routledge. The Newbery Medal, the oldest and most influential children's book award in the United States, marks its 100th anniversary this year. In Dust Off the Gold Medal, Schwebel and Van Tuyl collect fourteen essays, written by contributors across the country, who examine Newbery winners that have been understudied by literary scholars.

Sara Schwebel