Karahalios selected as a 2019 ACM Distinguished Member

Karrie Karahalios
Karrie Karahalios, Affiliate Professor

Affiliate Professor Karrie Karahalios, professor of computer science, has been recognized by the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) as a 2019 Distinguished Member.

Karahalios is a leading expert in interactive and social computing, a field that explores the impact of computer mediation on human interactions and relationships. She has worked with speech and education professors to create visualization tools that help assess and aid autistic children and their parents. Karahalios is also at the forefront in examining the algorithms that tie us together and the ethics behind them, building interfaces to examine social media. Her award-winning 2015 study examining Facebook's news feed has helped to spark an important discussion about algorithmic bias.

ACM is the world's largest educational and scientific computing society, uniting educators, researchers and professionals to inspire dialogue, share resources, and address the field's challenges. 

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