Kilicoglu to present research on biomedical language processing and scientific transparency

Halil Kilicoglu
Halil Kilicoglu, Associate Professor

Associate Professor Halil Kilicoglu will give an invited lecture on February 6 at the University of Kentucky Institute for Biomedical Informatics.

His talk, "Promoting Transparency in Biomedical Publications using Natural Language Processing," will focus on how biomedical language processing and text mining (bioNLP) techniques can be used to promote the rigor, reproducibility, and transparency of biomedical research.

According to Kilicoglu, as biomedical research output increases exponentially, automated tools are needed to assist scientists, journals, and funding organizations in assessing and improving research output.

"In my talk, I will discuss how I have been using bioNLP methods to address rigor and transparency-related issues. I will specifically focus on my work on assessing clinical trial publications for reporting quality and elucidating contradictory claims in biomedical publications," Kilicoglu said. "I will also highlight some of the challenges facing bioNLP research."

Kilicoglu earned his PhD in computer science from Concordia University in 2012. Prior to joining the iSchool faculty, he worked as a staff scientist at the U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, where he led the Semantic Knowledge Representation project.

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