Stodden to present reproducibility research at AAAS Annual Meeting

Associate Professor Victoria Stodden will present her reproducibility research at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting, which is billed as the world's largest general scientific gathering. The 2020 meeting, with the theme "Envisioning Tomorrow’s Earth," will take place on February 13-16 in Seattle, Washington.

Stodden will present during the session, "The Reproducibility Revolution: Impacts on Science, Journalism, and Society." In her talk, "Reproducibility Across Research Disciplines and Stakeholder Communities," she will outline new milestones for promoting transparency and openness resulting from collective action by disparate stakeholders including publishers, libraries, and government agencies and rulemakers.

A leading expert in the area of reproducibility in computational science, Stodden has served as a member of the National Academies of Science Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) Committee on Reproducibility and Replication and the NASEM Roundtable on Data Science Post-Secondary Education. She is a member of the National Academy of Engineering Online Ethics Center Advisory Group and National Institute of Statistical Sciences (NISS), and a member-at-large of the Statistics section of the AAAS.

At Illinois, Stodden holds faculty affiliate appointments in the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), Coordinated Science Lab, College of Law, Department of Statistics, and Department of Computer Science. She earned her PhD in statistics from Stanford University and her law degree from Stanford Law School.

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