Hao defends dissertation

Yun Hao
Yun Hao

Doctoral candidate Yun Hao successfully defended her dissertation, "Towards a Better Understanding of Music Playlist Titles and Descriptions," on April 6.

Her committee included Professor J. Stephen Downie (chair); Associate Professor Vetle Torvik; Assistant Professor Nigel Bosch; Xiao Hu, associate professor at The University of Hong Kong; and Andreas Ehmann, manager of research/data science at Pandora Inc.

Abstract: Music playlists, either user-generated or curated by music streaming services, often come with titles and descriptions. Although informative, these titles and descriptions make up a sparse and noisy semantic space that is challenging to be leveraged for tasks such as making music recommendations. This dissertation is dedicated to developing a better understanding of playlist titles and descriptions by leveraging track sequences in playlists. Specifically, work has been done to capture latent patterns in tracks by an embedding approach, and the latent patterns are found to be well aligned with the organizing principles of mix tapes identified more than a decade ago. Effectiveness of the latent patterns is evaluated by the task of generating descriptive keywords/tags for playlists given tracks, indicating that the latent patterns learned from tracks in playlists are able to provide a good understanding of playlist titles and descriptions. The identified latent patterns are further leveraged to improve model performance on the task of predicting missing tracks given playlist titles and descriptions. Experimental results show that the proposed models yield improvements to the task, especially when playlist descriptions are provided as model input in addition to titles. Main contributions of this work include (1) providing a better solution to dealing with "cold-start'' playlists in music recommender systems, and (2) proposing an effective approach to automatically generating descriptive keywords/tags for playlists using track sequences.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Mattson authors new book on teaching digital ethics

Adjunct Lecturer Kristen Mattson has authored a new book on teaching digital ethics. Ethics in a Digital World: Guiding Students Through Society's Biggest Questions was recently published by the International Society for Technology in Education. Mattson designed the book to help students look at the technology around them through a critical lens.

Kristen Mattson

Gabriel to present research at ACRL 2021

PhD student Jamillah R. Gabriel will present her research at the Association of College & Research Libraries Conference (ACRL 2021), which will be held virtually from April 13-16. The theme of this year's conference is "Ascending into an Open Future."

Jamillah Gabriel

Twidale to share research on computer-supported cooperative work

Professor Michael Twidale will discuss his research on computer-supported cooperative work at the Columbia Science Review's event, "E-Living: Social Interactions in a Virtual World." E-Living, which will be held virtually on April 15, will include a panel discussion on how people form relationships online and how software can be better designed to support this networking. As described on the event's website, discussions will also focus on how videoconferencing companies like Zoom are evolving to make online interactions easier, "especially considering the fact that numerous companies and schools are moving online even after the coronavirus pandemic ends."

Professor Michael Twidale

Diesner and students organize tutorials for The Web Conference

Associate Professor Jana Diesner and her students have organized two tutorials for The Web Conference 2021. The conference, which will be held virtually from April 12-23, will address the evolution and current state of the Web through the lens of computer science, computational social science, economics, public policy, and Web-based applications.

Assistant Professor Jana Diesner

iSchool researchers to present at The Web Conference 2021

iSchool researchers will present their work at The Web Conference 2021. The conference, which will be held virtually from April 12-23, will address the evolution and current state of the Web through the lens of computer science, computational social science, economics, public policy, and Web-based applications.