Whole Tale Archaeology Working Group meets DataONE for first “Prov-a-thon”

Bertram Ludäscher
Bertram Ludäscher, Professor and Director, Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship
Peter Darch
Peter Darch, Assistant Professor
Linh Hoang
Linh Hoang

Members of the Whole Tale Archaeology Working Group will meet with fellow computational archaeologists, environmental scientists, and other researchers for the first "Prov-a-thon" on practical tools for reproducible science. Held in conjunction with the DataONE All-Hands Meeting in Santa Ana Pueblo, New Mexico, the two-day workshop on August 31 and September 1 is cosponsored by the NSF-funded projects Whole Tale, DataONE, and the Arctic Data Center.

The goal of the workshop is to expose scientists to existing and emerging provenance tools from DataONE, Whole Tale, and other projects (e.g., SKOPE),  and conversely, to gather feedback, new requirements, and new ideas for effective uses of provenance from the scientific community. The first day of the workshop will focus on hands-on demos and tutorials using existing tools and prototypes, while on the second day, scientists will work on their own uses cases involving provenance. 

The Prov-a-thon is co-organized by Professor Bertram Ludäscher, iSchool director of the Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship, and principal investigator for the Whole Tale project; Amber Budden, Matt Jones, and Dave Vieglais from DataONE; and Kyle Bocinsky, Whole Tale Archaeology Working Group lead and Ludäscher’s collaborator on SKOPE. Other iSchool participants include Assistant Professor Peter Darch, who leads the Information Science Working Group of Whole Tale; doctoral student Linh Hoang; MS/IM student Pratik Shrivastava; and Hui Lyu (MS ‘17), who is now in the PhD program at the University of Pennsylvania. All three students conducted provenance research and development as 2017 summer interns for DataONE (Hoang, Lyu) and Whole-Tale (Shrivastava). They will present posters on their work on "Prospective and Retrospective Provenance Queries using YesWorkflow, RDF, and SPARQL" and "Opening the Black Box of a Paleoclimate Reconstruction based on PaleoCar" at the workshop. 

"Provenance information has long been recognized as crucial metadata in the information sciences, such as in archival science and library and information science, but in recent years, provenance research has also been a hot topic in computer science. Now it is interesting to see whether and how this research may be translated into practical tools for the computational sciences and data science," said Ludäscher, who conducts provenance research in a number of his projects.

"Provenance is at the heart of transparency and open science and can help debug hard-to-reproduce computational studies. I am very much looking forward to seeing scientists and provenance tool makers join the fray in this first Prov-a-thon," he added.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Cheng defends dissertation

Doctoral candidate Jessica Cheng successfully defended her dissertation, "Agreeing to Disagree: Applying a Logic-based Approach to Reconciling and Merging Multiple Taxonomies," on May 25. 

Jessica Cheng

Student award recipients announced

Each year, the School of Information Sciences recognizes a group of outstanding students for their achievement in academics as well as a number of attributes that contribute to professional success. Congratulations to this year's honorees!

Alma with cap

Brooks presents keynote at West African conference

Ian Brooks, iSchool research scientist and director of the Center for Health Informatics (CHI), gave a keynote talk at the West Africa Conference on Digital Public Goods and Cybersecurity, which was held on May 9-10 in Freetown, Sierra Leone. The conference focused on bridging the gender gap in digital public goods and cybersecurity spaces in Africa.

Ian Brooks

New project to help identify and predict insider threats

Insider threats are one of the top security concerns facing large organizations. Current and former employees, business partners, contractors—anyone with the right level of access to a company’s data—can pose a threat. The incidence of insider threats has increased in recent years, at a significant cost to companies. Associate Professor Jingrui He is addressing this problem in a new project that seeks to detect and predict insider threats. She has been awarded a three-year, $200,000 grant from the C3.ai Digital Transformation Institute for her project, "Multi-Facet Rare Event Modeling of Adaptive Insider Threats."

Jingrui He

iSchool students present their research at Urbana City Council meeting

At the Urbana City Council meeting on May 9, students in the Community Data (IS 594) course presented their research on how communities are reducing gun violence. According to their instructor Chamee Yang, postdoctoral research associate with the iSchool, Community Data Clinic, and Just Infrastructures Initiative, the new course was designed as an experiential learning opportunity with a community engagement component, where students could gain research experience with real-world implications. Throughout the Spring 2022 semester, students worked in groups to explore community-driven approaches to prevent gun violence.

Chamee Yang, Sarah Unruh, and Gowri Balasubramaniam