iSchool to make strong showing at iConference 2019

The following iSchool faculty, staff, and students will participate in iConference 2019, which will be held March 31-April 1 in Washington, D.C. The annual event brings together scholars, researchers, and information professionals to share insights on critical information issues. The theme of this year's conference is "Inform. Include. Inspire."

Sunday, March 31

Doctoral candidate Beth Strickland Bloch will participate in the Doctoral Colloquium, 8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.

Associate Professor Kate Williams, Hui Yan (Renmin University of China), Noah Lenstra (UNC Greensboro), and Shenglong Han (Peking University) will present the workshop, "Human Agency Towards Digital Inclusion: Implementing an International Study of Tech Help Networks," 8:30-10:00 a.m.

Associate Professor Kate McDowell, Professor Michael Twidale, and Assistant Professor Matthew Turk will present the workshop, "Troubleshooting Data Storytelling," 1:30-3:00 p.m.

Monday, April 1

Assistant Professor Peter Darch and doctoral student Lo Lee, with Noriko Hara and Clinton McKay (Indiana University), Bei Yu (Syracuse University), Yan Zhang (UT Austin), and Tao Chen (Google), will present, "How Do We Promote Public Engagement with Science?," 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.

Assistant Professor Peter Darch will chair the session, "Papers 5: Measuring and Tracking Scientific Literature," 1:30-3:00 p.m.

Assistant Professor Karen Wickett, with Ayse Gursoy (UT Austin) and Melanie Feinberg (UNC Chapel Hill), will present, "Understanding Change in a Dynamic Complex Digital Object: Reading Categories of Change Out of Patch Notes Documents," 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Tuesday, April 2

Professor Michael Twidale and David M. Nichols (University of Waikato, New Zealand) will present their paper, "Radical Research Honesty in a Post-Truth Society," 1:30-3:00 p.m.

Associate Professor Jana Diesner, with Aseel Addawood (Illinois Informatics Institute) and Priyanka Balakumar (Computer Science Department, Illinois), will present the paper, "Categorization and Comparison of Influential Twitter Users and Sources Referenced in Tweets for Two Health-Related Topics," 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Associate Professor Catherine Blake will chair the session, "Papers 20: Data Mining and NLP," 3:30-5:00 p.m.

Professor J. Stephen Downie, Visiting Research Services Specialist Ryan Dubnicek, and doctoral student Yuerong Hu, with David M. Weigl and Kevin Page (University of Oxford), will present their poster, "Bridging the Information Gap between Structural and Note-level Musical Datasets," 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Professor J. Stephen Downie and MS/LIS student Halle Burns, with Toby Burrows, David Lewis, Kevin Page, and Athanasios Velios (University of Oxford), will present their poster, "Assessing the Practicality of ARK Identifier Usage in a Catalogue of Medieval Manuscripts," 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Doctoral student Michael Gryk will present his poster, “Widget Design as a Guide to Information Modeling,” 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Professor Bertram Ludäscher, MS/IM student Lan Li, and Qian Zhang (University of Waterloo) will present their poster, "Towards More Transparent, Reproducible, and Reusable Data Cleaning with Openrefine," 5:00-6:00 p.m.

Wednesday, April 3

Assistant Professor Rachel M. Magee and Abigail Phillips (UW Milwaukee) will present their paper, "Mental Health and the iSchools: Audiences and Strategies for Support," 10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
 

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