Stodden coauthors National Academies report

Earlier this month, the U.S. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine released a committee report examining computational reproducibility and replicability in science, with the goals of improving research rigor and transparency. The congressionally mandated report was authored by an ad hoc committee of national experts, including iSchool Associate Professor Victoria Stodden.

The report has implications for scholarly communications and the management of research data with the overarching goal of contributing to confidence in scientific knowledge. It recommends strategies that will allow "researchers, academic institutions, journals, and funders [to] help strengthen rigor and transparency in order to improve the reproducibility and replicability of scientific research."

The report was based on a study completed by the Committee on Reproducibility and Replicability, of which Stodden is a member. The study was sponsored by the prestigious National Science Foundation and Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

Stodden's research addresses a wide range of topics, including standards of openness for data and code sharing, legal and policy barriers to disseminating reproducible research, robustness in replicated findings, cyberinfrastructure to enable reproducibility, and scientific publishing practices. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science, the NAS Roundtable on Data Science Postsecondary Education, and a Member-at-Large of the Statistics section (Section U) of The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

In addition to her appointment at the iSchool, Stodden holds faculty affiliate appointments in the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), Coordinated Science Lab, College of Law, Department of Statistics, and Department of Computer Science. Stodden earned both her PhD in statistics and her law degree from Stanford University.

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