Willis defends dissertation

Craig Willis
Craig Willis

Doctoral candidate Craig Willis successfully defended his dissertation, "Trust, But Verify: An Investigation of Methods of Verification and Dissemination of Computational Research Artifacts for Transparency and Reproducibility," on June 15.

His committee included Associate Professor Victoria Stodden (chair); Assistant Professor Peter Darch; Professor Bertram Ludäscher; and Michela Taufer, professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

From the abstract: In this study, I investigate how research communities are addressing concerns about the quality and rigor of computational research. I focus specifically on initiatives to expand the peer review and publication process to include new requirements for the assessment and dissemination of computational research artifacts. I report the results of a multiple-case analysis of two primary (American Journal of Political Science, ACM/IEEE Supercomputing) and five supplemental cases in political science, computer science, economics, mathematics, and statistics. Cases were developed through qualitative analysis based on interviews with key stakeholders (n= 17) including editors, reviewers, and verifiers; a sample of (n= 27) verified artifacts; and documentary evidence including policies, guidelines, and workflows. Based on the cases, I identify key factors that influence the operationalization of policies and workflows; the elements that each community considers important to the assessment of computational transparency and reproducibility; as well as the tools and infrastructure that they leverage to aid in the creation, assessment and dissemination of reproducible research artifacts. I develop a framework to analyze the reproducibility initiatives and a conceptual model of reproducible research artifacts. I relate my findings to recommendations from the recent National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) report on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science and provide a set of normative guidelines for communities interested in pursuing similar initiatives with implications for journal and conference leadership; tool and infrastructure developers; and funding bodies. I conclude that, while promising, further efforts should be made to increase our understanding of the effect of initiative policies and technological advancements on research quality.

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