Hoang to discuss drug-drug interaction research at AMIA

Linh Hoang
Linh Hoang
Jodi Schneider
Jodi Schneider, Assistant Professor
Nigel Bosch
Nigel Bosch, Assistant Professor

PhD student Linh Hoang will present her research with Assistant Professor Jodi Schneider and Assistant Professor Nigel Bosch at the AMIA (American Medical Informatics Association) Annual Symposium, which will be held virtually from November 14-18. The symposium showcases the latest innovations from the community of biomedical informatics researchers and practitioners.

Hoang will present the paper, "Automatically Classifying the Evidence Type of Drug-Drug Interaction Research Papers as a Step Toward Computer Supported Evidence Curation," which she coauthored with Schneider, Bosch, Richard D. Boyce and Britney Stottlemyer of the University of Pittsburgh, and Mathias Brochhausen of the University of Florida, Gainesville.

"Drug-drug interactions (DDIs) are often a patient safety concern," said Hoang. "However, knowledge bases that discuss DDIs are known for being incomplete and inconsistent with one another. Drug experts, who develop DDI knowledge, need to search for and review evidence from biomedical literature before synthesizing the evidence into clinically useful recommendations. We believe that computer-supported evidence assessment could help drug experts be more efficient and objective in assessing DDI evidence from the literature."

In their paper, the researchers tested the feasibility of using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning (ML) to classify clinical DDI papers into the formally defined evidence types present in an existing ontology, DIDEO.

"The results suggested that it is feasible to accurately automate the classification of DDI evidence types, which could be a key component of a computerized decision support to help experts be more objective in assessing DDI evidence," said Hoang. "In addition, using existing knowledge about DDI evidence provided by the ontology was a two-way benefit: the NLP/ML tool design helps identify evidence types that do not exist in the current ontology, and the ontology provides the structure that helps construct our NLP/ML tool development more efficiently."

Hoang's research interests include information management, knowledge discovery, and data analytics. She holds a master's in information systems from the University of Surrey in England and a bachelor's in information technology from the Hanoi University of Science and Technology in Vietnam.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Bonn to discuss Scholarly Communications Notebook at OE Global 2020

Associate Professor and MS/LIS Program Director Maria Bonn will present her research at OE (Open Education) Global 2020, which will be held virtually from November 16-20.  The conference attracts researchers, practitioners, policy makers, educators, and students to discuss and explore how Open Education advances educational practices around the world.

Maria Bonn

Underwood and students present research at CHR2020

Professor Ted Underwood, PhD students Wenyi Shang and Yuerong Hu, MS/IM students Anirudh Sharma and Shubhangi Singhal, and English PhD student Peizhen Wu will present their research at the Workshop on Computational Humanities Research (CHR2020), which will be held virtually from November 18-20. The purpose of the workshop is to "foster the formation of a community of humanities scholars that rely on a wide range of computational approaches" and to serve as a stepping stone toward the creation of a research-oriented, open-access computational humanities journal.

Ted Underwood

Bloch defends dissertation

Doctoral candidate Beth Bloch successfully defended her dissertation, "The Values and Ethics of Biomedical Engineering Practices in The Design of Novel Biotechnologies," on November 13.

Beth Bloch

Kilicoglu and Hoang present their bioinformatics research at AMIA

Associate Professor Halil Kilicoglu and PhD student Linh Hoang will present their research at the AMIA (American Medical Informatics Association) Annual Symposium, which will be held virtually from November 14-18. The symposium showcases the latest innovations from the community of biomedical informatics researchers and practitioners.

Halil Kilicoglu

Rayward shares expertise on Otlet

Professor Emeritus Boyd Rayward was recently interviewed in Mons, Belgium, at a meeting of scholars involved in the HyperOtlet research project. This multi and transciplinary project is focused on Le Traité de documentation, a major book in the history of information sciences that was written in 1934 by Paul Otlet, a Belgian lawyer, bibliographer, internationalist, and pacifist whose ideas foreshadowed current digital and other technologies such as the Internet, hypertext, and Wikipedia.

Rayward interview