Bruce authors new book on thinking with maps

Chip Bruce
Chip Bruce, Professor Emeritus

Professor Emeritus Chip Bruce has authored a new book on the nature and importance of maps. In Thinking with Maps: Understanding the World through Spatialization, which was recently published by Rowman & Littlefield, he demonstrates how the concept of maps and mapping has implications and applications across all spheres of intellectual endeavor.

"Maps for me represent the essence of interdisciplinary or holistic understanding of the world. The fact that they are created by so many different people, for different purposes, makes them a challenge to understand, but also an unending source of pleasure," wrote Bruce in the foreword of his book.

Thinking with Maps shows that maps are valuable not only for geographic knowledge but for providing "mechanisms for rejuvenating our engagement with the world." According to Bruce, in writing the book he hoped to continue his exploration of the world that he started in his book, Education's Ecosystems: Learning through Life (Rowman & Littlefield, 2020).

Bruce received his BA in biology from Rice University and PhD in computer science from the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to his semi-retirement in 2011, he had appointments in Education, Bioengineering, the Center for Writing Studies, and the Center for East Asian and Pacific Studies at the University of Illinois. During 2007-08, he held a Fulbright Distinguished Chair at the National College of Ireland in Dublin. His work has focused on inquiry-based learning, community inquiry, and the information and communication practices that help people in communities learn and work together.

Tags:
Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Cora Thomassen, former faculty member, passes away

Cora Thomassen passed away on December 23, 2021. Thomassen earned her MS/LIS degree from the University of Illinois in 1955. She became the librarian at South Haven, Michigan, public schools, and then librarian to an extension of Southern Illinois University in Carbondale. In 1961, she accepted an assistant professor of library science position at the U of I, becoming a tenured associate professor in 1969.

Cora Thomassen

Wang research group to present at IEEE BigData 2021

Members of Associate Professor Dong Wang's research group, the Social Sensing Lab, will present papers at the 2021 IEEE International Conference on Big Data (IEEE BigData 2021), which will be held virtually from December 15-18.

Dong Wang

New project to help scientists mitigate risks of environmental pollutants

In addition to killing insects and weeds, pesticides can be toxic to the environment and harmful to human health. A new project led by Associate Professor Dong Wang and Huichun Zhang, Frank H. Neff Professor of Civil Engineering at Case Western Reserve University, will help scientists mitigate the environmental and ecological risks of pollutants such as pesticides and develop remediation strategies for cleaner water, soil, and air. The researchers have received a three-year, $402,773 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant for their project, "Machine Learning Modeling for the Reactivity of Organic Contaminants in Engineered and Natural Environments."

Dong Wang

New course focuses on social history of games and gaming

The iSchool has introduced a new course for undergraduate students who are interested in gaming. Social History of Games & Gaming (IS 199 SHG) is a survey of the history of gaming from the ancient world through the twentieth century and its impact on science, society, and culture. Taught by Teaching Associate Professor David Dubin, the course fulfills a general education requirement for students majoring in information sciences. It is taught in a lecture and discussion format, engaging students with the material and promoting participation.

David Dubin

iSchool researchers discuss misinformation

Several iSchool researchers participated in the recent Misinformation Research Symposium, which was hosted by the Center for Social and Behavioral Science and sponsored by the Center for Advanced Study, Interdisciplinary Health Sciences Institute, and National Center for Supercomputing Applications. The goals of the symposium were to help connect misinformation research on campus, foster interdisciplinary teams interested in collaborating on external submissions, and learn more about the needs of existing and emerging research groups on campus.