Workshop to examine provenance for transparent research

T7 Workshop logo

iSchool researchers have co-organized a highly interactive workshop on traceable, transparent, and trustworthy research as part of ProvenanceWeek 2021. The T7 Workshop: Provenance for Transparent Research aims to engage attendees in a focused conversation about how methods for automated provenance capture, storage, query, inference, and visualization can make research more transparent and the trustworthiness of results easier to evaluate, both by other researchers and the public. The free workshop will be held on July 22 from 9:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m. CT.

T7 organizers include Tim McPhillips, software developer in the iSchool’s Center for Informatics Research in Science and Scholarship (CIRSS); Professor and CIRSS Director Bertram Ludäscher; Carole Goble, University of Manchester; Craig Willis, CIRSS research programmer; and Shawn Bowers, Gonzaga University. The workshop format will consist of a keynote address by Lars Vilhuber, executive director of the Labor Dynamics Institute at Cornell University, followed by six lightning talks and mini discussion sessions. All workshop participants will be invited to comment and contribute their own definitions, priorities, and user requirements in real time via shared documents and polls.

For more information and to register, visit the T7 Workshop website.

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