Wang research group to present at The ACM Web Conference 2022

Dong Wang
Dong Wang, Associate Professor
Lanyu Shang
Lanyu Shang

Members of Associate Professor Dong Wang's research group, the Social Sensing Lab, will present their research at The ACM Web Conference 2022. The conference, which will be held virtually April 25-29, is the premier venue to present and discuss progress in research, development, standards, and applications of topics related to the Web.

PhD student Lanyu Shang will present her paper, "A Duo-Generative Approach to Explainable Multimodal COVID-19 Misinformation Detection," which introduces a new duo-generative explainable misinformation detection (DGExplain) framework to detect and explain misinformation in multimodal COVID-19 news articles. According to Shang, after evaluating DGExplain on two real-world multimodal COVID-19 news datasets, it was found to significantly outperform state-of-the-art baselines in accuracy and explainability.

PhD student Ziyi Kou will present his paper, "Can I Only Share My Eyes? A Web Crowdsourcing-Based Face Partition Approach Towards Privacy-Aware Face Recognition," which addresses social media users' concerns over their online facial images being used for machine learning/AI models in applications, such as face detection. He introduces FaceCrowd, a web crowdsourcing-based face partition approach, which not only improves the accuracy of face recognition models but also protects the identity information of social media users.

The primary research focus of the Social Sensing Lab lies in the emerging area of human-centered AI, big data, and cyber-physical systems in social spaces, where data are collected from human sources or devices on their behalf. The work from the lab addresses the fundamental challenges in social sensing by developing human-centric computing theories, techniques, and systems that reconstruct the correct "state of the world," both physical and social.

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