Two iSchool students named ARL Diversity Scholars

Two iSchool master's students have been selected by the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) Committee on Diversity and Leadership to participate in the Initiative to Recruit a Diverse Workforce (IRDW) as ARL Diversity Scholars.

Funded by ARL member libraries and EBSCO Information Services, the IRDW offers numerous financial benefits to program participants as well as leadership development provided through the ARL Annual Leadership Symposium, a formal mentoring program, career placement assistance, and an ARL research library visit. This program reflects the commitment of ARL members to create a diverse research library professional community that will better meet the needs of researchers, students, and other constituencies whose demographics and perspectives are quickly evolving.

The 2018–2020 ARL Diversity Scholars are: 

  • Christina Denise Bush, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Ben B. Chiewphasa, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
  • Helen Y. Chu, Rutgers University
  • Reza Davallow Ghajar, University of British Columbia
  • Hadeer Elsbai, Queens College, CUNY
  • Natalia Estrada, Kent State University
  • Patrice Green, University of South Carolina
  • Joan Hua, University of Washington
  • Phillip Thomas MacDonald, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Milton Ricardo Antonio Machuca-Gálvez, Rutgers University
  • Jamie Lee Morin, University of Toronto
  • Regen Le Roy, University of Michigan
  • Janis Joyce Shearer, St. Catherine University
  • Zakir Jamal Suleman, University of British Columbia
  • Nam Jin Yoon, University of Washington
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