iSchool at ASIS&T 2018

iSchool faculty, staff, and students will participate in the Association for Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) Annual Meeting, which will be held November 10-14 in Vancouver, Canada. The theme of this year's conference is "Building and Sustaining an Ethical Future with Emerging Technology." The meeting, now in its 81st year, is the premier international conference dedicated to the study of information, people, and technology in contemporary society. Associate Professor Kathryn La Barre and Associate Professor Emily Knox are members of the ASIS&T Board of Directors, contributing to governance activities.

Saturday, November 10

Affiliate Professor Neil R. Smalheiser will present at the session, "Metrics 2018: Workshop on Informetric and Scientometric Research," at 9:00 a.m.

Assistant Professor Melissa Ocepek will participate in the 18th Annual SIG-USE Research Symposium, "Moving toward the Future of Information Behavior Research and Practice," at 1:00 p.m.

Sunday, November 11

PhD student Beth Bloch will participate in the Doctoral Colloquium at 8:30 a.m.

Associate Professor Kathryn La Barre will moderate the panel, "Glittering in the Dark: Memory, Culture, and Critique of the History of Information," at 3:00 p.m.

Monday, November 12

Associate Professor Kathryn La Barre and Associate Professor Carol Tilley will participate in the panel, "Everyday Documentation of Arts and Humanities Collections," at 8:30 a.m. 

Professor and Dean Allen Renear will present his paper, "Toward an Intensional Approach to Transformation Classification," at 8:30 a.m.

Associate Professor Kathryn La Barre will participate in the panel, "Infrastructural Justice and the Social Consequences of Occupational Classification," at 2:00 p.m.

Posters presented during the President’s Reception at 5:30 p.m. include:

  • PhD students Ly Dinh and Yi-Yun (Jessica) Cheng, "Middle of the (by)line: Examining Hyperauthorship Networks in the Human Genome Project"
  • PhD student Lo Lee and Visiting Assistant Professor Melissa Ocepek, "Everyday Information Practices: An Exploration of Intra-individual Information Behavior across Everyday Contexts"
  • PhD student Beth Bloch, "The Values and Design of Emerging Medical Biotechnologies: A Grounded Theory Analysis of TED Talks"
  • Research Scientist Megan Senseney and Eleanor Dickson, visiting HTRC digital humanities specialist, "Text Data Mining Beyond the Open Data Paradigm: Perspectives at the intersection of Intellectual Property and Ethics"

Tuesday, November 13

Assistant Professor Melissa Ocepek will participate in the panel, "Fandom, Food, and Folksonomies: The Methodological Realities of Studying Fun Life-Contexts," at 8:30 a.m. 

Assistant Professor Masooda Bashir will present the paper, "Surfing Safely: Examining Older Adults’ Online Privacy Protection Behaviors," with Informatics PhD student Hsiao-Ying Huang at 10:30 a.m.

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