Stodden discusses reproducibility at White House conference

Associate Professor Victoria Stodden presented her research on reproducibility at the White House National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) Conference, "Building Bridges Across the S&T Enterprise," which was held on June 13-14 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. The conference brought together science and technology (S&T) leaders to share best practices and build collaboration across the Federal S&T enterprise.

Stodden was a presenter and the moderator for the panel, “Supporting Public Access,” which examined the challenges and strategies for making information publicly accessible and data systems interoperable to facilitate R&D, improve healthcare outcomes, and promote greater scientific progress. In her presentation, she reviewed highlights from the recently released National Academies Report on Reproducibility and Replication that she coauthored

"The recent progress that federal agencies have made to facilitate access to federal research artifacts, such as data and software, is remarkable," she said. "The concepts of FAIR (Findable, Accessible, Interoperable, and Reusable) data and enabling the reproducibility of results pervaded the panel discussion."

Stodden's research addresses a wide range of topics, including standards of openness for data and code sharing, legal and policy barriers to disseminating reproducible research, robustness in replicated findings, cyberinfrastructure to enable reproducibility, and scientific publishing practices. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on Reproducibility and Replicability in Science, the NAS Roundtable on Data Science Postsecondary Education, and a Member-at-Large of the Statistics section (Section U) of The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS).

In addition to her appointment at the iSchool, Stodden holds faculty affiliate appointments in the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA), Coordinated Science Lab, College of Law, Department of Statistics, and Department of Computer Science. Stodden earned both her PhD in statistics and her law degree from Stanford University.

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