Hoiem presents research on economic justice in children’s literature at ChLA 2019

Elizabeth Hoiem
Elizabeth Hoiem, Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Elizabeth Hoiem presented her research at the Children's Literature Association conference (ChLA 2019), which was held June 13-15 in Indianapolis. With the theme "Activism and Empathy," this year's conference reflected on the role of children and children's literature in engaging with political concerns, promoting activism, and/or cultivating empathy.

In her talk, "Fair Trade for Children: Ethical Exchange in the Children's Literature of Jane Marcet and the 19th Century Cooperative Movement," Hoiem discussed representations of economic justice in children’s literature from 1800 to 1860.

"Scholars have previously assessed literature by Charles Dickens, Charlotte Tonna, Harriet Martineau, and Elizabeth Gaskell about industrialization and political economy," Hoiem said. "My approach, however, places children at the center of these ethical debates—as readers and consumers, but also as children who worked alongside adults to produce goods for trade."

At ChLA 2019, Hoiem received the Judith Plotz Emerging Scholar Award and co-organized, with Katharine Kittredge (Ithaca College), an information event on archival research, which was sponsored by the "Early Children's Literature and Culture" scholars group.

Hoiem teaches in the areas of reading and literacy, history of children's literature, and fantasy literature. In her research and teaching, she explores the history of technological innovations in children’s literature, from early children’s books and toys to contemporary applications of digital pedagogy. She received a 2018 National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship for her current book project, "The Education of Things: Mechanical Literacy in British Culture, 1752-1860." This project investigates the class politics of "object lessons," a mode of experiential learning that developed during the late-eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with the rise in child labor and mass literacy. Her recent articles are published in The Lion and the Unicorn and Children's Literature. Hoiem holds a PhD in English from Illinois.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

New role for Pintar

The iSchool is pleased to announce that Judith Pintar is now a teaching associate professor. In her new position, in addition to teaching core courses in the BS in information science (BS/IS) program, she will develop and teach courses related to game studies and interactive narrative design for both undergraduates and graduate students.

Judith Pintar

Jett defends dissertation

Doctoral candidate Jacob Jett successfully defended his dissertation, "Towards a General Conceptual Model for Bibliographic Aggregates," on August 12.

Jacob Jett

Schwebel selected to lead CCB

Historian and children's literature scholar Sara L. Schwebel has been named director of The Center for Children's Books (CCB) and professor of information sciences at Illinois. She previously served as a professor of English and women's & gender studies at the University of South Carolina (USC). Prior to her academic career, she taught English and history to middle school students in Connecticut and Virginia.

Sara Schwebel

Bashir promoted to associate professor

Masooda Bashir has been promoted to the position of associate professor at the School of Information Sciences, effective August 16, 2019. Bashir joined the iSchool faculty in 2013. She previously served as assistant director for social trust initiatives in the Information Trust Institute (ITI) at Illinois, where she led multiple ITI educational initiatives, including the Summer Research Experience for Undergraduates program and the Illinois Cyber Security Scholars Program (ICSSP). 

Masooda Bashir

Knox named 2019-2020 Centennial Scholar

Associate Professor and BS/IS Program Director Emily Knox has been named the iSchool's Centennial Scholar for 2019-2020. Endowed by alumni and friends of the School, the Centennial Scholar award recognizes outstanding accomplishments and/or professional promise in the field of library and information science.

Emily Knox