Gabriel and Terrones discuss diversity in LIS education at JCLC

Jamillah Gabriel
Jamillah R. Gabriel
Lettycia Terrones
Lettycia Terrones

Doctoral students Jamillah Gabriel and Lettycia Terrones will discuss diversity in LIS education at the Joint Conference of Librarians of Color (JCLC), which will be held in Albuquerque, New Mexico, from September 26-30. The conference brings together librarians, staff, and supporters as well as community participants to explore issues of diversity in libraries.

During the panel, "Conceptualizing Diversity and Inclusion in Information Sciences as Doctoral Students of Color," Gabriel and Terrones will examine the diversity and inclusion gaps found in LIS higher education and present arguments for the recruitment of people of color (POC) librarians to PhD programs. In addition, they will discuss the importance of mentoring and funding in LIS programs to attract and retain students of color.

"Attention towards integrated mentoring models offers ways to not only increase immediate student retention, but further creates capacity for innovation in LIS curriculum responsive to creating a diverse student body," Gabriel explained.

"We advocate for stakeholders across library constituencies to pursue comprehensive funding for LIS doctoral students to secure the future recruitment and retention of marginalized students," said Terrones.

Gabriel's research interests focus on the information behaviors of African Americans and the effectiveness of cultural heritage institutions (libraries, archives, museums) at meeting the needs of African American communities. She is also interested in information literacy, community informatics, social justice, community engagement, and diversity and inclusion. Gabriel earned her MLIS from San Jose State University and also holds an MA in museum studies from Indiana University Purdue University Indianapolis.

Terrones uses interdisciplinary methods, particularly Chicana Feminist Theory and Performance Studies, to interrogate strategies for minoritarian resistance deployed in the picturebook art form. In her work, she examines how aesthetic/political strategies contribute to decolonial library services for children and families. By doing so, she aims to foster conversations between critical ethnic studies approaches in library science curriculum and children's library services. She holds an MLIS from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

New life for letterpress printing

The old, green hand press that used to be stationed on the first floor of the iSchool building is getting a new lease on life. It has been moved to the Champaign-Urbana Community Fab Lab, where students and community members will be using it for letterpress printing. The Washington-style hand press, which was manufactured in the late nineteenth or early twentieth century by Reliance, was used for teaching and fine printing at the University of Illinois for decades before becoming a show piece at the iSchool.

Emilie Butt using printing press

Research on Diversity in Youth Literature moves to Illinois

Research on Diversity in Youth Literature (RDYL), a peer-reviewed, online, and open-access journal focused on issues of diversity, equity, social justice, inclusion, and intersectionality in youth literature, culture, and media, has moved from St. Catherine University to the iSchool's Center for Children's Books. The journal is co-edited by iSchool Associate Professor Sarah Park Dahlen and Sonia Alejandra Rodríguez, associate professor of English at LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York.

RDYL logo

Petrella receives ALISE/University of Washington iSchool Travel Award

PhD student Julia Burns Petrella has been selected as the 2022 recipient of the Association for Library and Information Science Education (ALISE)/University of Washington Information School Youth Services Graduate Student Travel Award, which will support her participation in the ALISE Annual Conference.

Julia Burns Petrella

New HRI Research Clusters include iSchool faculty

Two projects led by iSchool faculty members have been selected as Humanities Research Institute (HRI) Research Clusters for 2022-2023. Formerly known as the Illinois Program for Research in the Humanities, HRI fosters interdisciplinary study in the humanities, arts, and social sciences at the University of Illinois. HRI Research Clusters enable faculty and graduate students to "develop questions or subjects of inquiry that require or would be enhanced by collaborative work." Projects selected as clusters receive grants of $2,500 to support their activities.

Cheng defends dissertation

Doctoral candidate Jessica Cheng successfully defended her dissertation, "Agreeing to Disagree: Applying a Logic-based Approach to Reconciling and Merging Multiple Taxonomies," on May 25. 

Jessica Cheng