Chin receives NIH grant for study of false HPV-vaccine information

Jessie Chin
Jessie Chin, Assistant Professor

Assistant Professor Jessie Chin has received a $389,810 grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to identify false information about the HPV vaccine and model its impact on risk perceptions.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the U.S., with over 34,000 new HPV-related cancers diagnosed annually, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. An HPV vaccine, which was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006, is recommended as part of routine vaccinations for school-aged children. However, the vaccine's uptake remains low in part because of incorrect perceptions of vaccination risks, which has been linked to the spread of false information about the vaccine.

"I've been working on how to promote an accurate comprehension of health information among adults with varying degrees of health literacy. While people with inadequate health literacy are vulnerable to health misinformation, people with adequate health literacy may also fail to identify health misinformation, especially when it has been delivered from known social connections," Chin said of how the project originated.

Chin and her collaborators from the University of Illinois at Chicago and University of Chicago will build a model to identify false HPV-vaccine information on Twitter and demonstrate its impact on individual risk perceptions.

"We propose a novel approach to leverage machine learning, natural language processing, network analysis, crowdsourcing/expert data annotation, psycholinguistic analysis, and statistical modeling to investigate the false HPV-vaccine information collectively (in terms of its detection and propagation patterns) and individually (in terms of its impact and underlying cognitive mechanisms)," she said.

According to Chin, the project's findings will provide important contributions toward understanding the impact of false health information on HPV vaccination behavior and could be expanded to other health topics. The project will also address the National Cancer Institute priorities in promoting HPV vaccines and combating misinformation in cancer prevention and control.

Chin holds a BS in psychology from National Taiwan University, an MS in human factors, and a PhD in educational psychology with a focus on cognitive science in teaching and learning from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Updated on
Backto the news archive

Related News

Barbosa and Wang receive Facebook grant to design privacy controls for ad targeting

iSchool PhD student Natã Barbosa and his advisor Associate Professor Yang Wang have received a $65,053 grant from Facebook for their project, "In-Situ Privacy Controls of Profiling and Ad-Targeting." The goal of the project is to design a privacy control framework that makes profiling and ad-targeting more transparent to ordinary Internet users.

Yang Wang

Anderson selected as 2019-2021 iSchool research fellow

Theresa Dirndorfer Anderson has been selected by the iSchool faculty as a research fellow for the 2019-2021 academic years. Research fellows are chosen because their work is relevant to the interests of the School's faculty and students. During the period of their appointments, fellows give at least one public lecture.

Theresa Anderson

Student award recipients announced

Each year, the School recognizes a group of outstanding students for their achievement in academics as well as a number of attributes that contribute to professional success. Congratulations to this year's honorees!

Diesner joins Science Advances editorial board

Associate Professor and PhD Program Director Jana Diesner is a new associate editor on the editorial board of Science Advances, the open access multidisciplinary journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). The journal supports the AAAS mission by extending the capacity of Science magazine to identify and promote significant advances in science and engineering across a wide range of areas. Science Advances editors not only have stellar reputations in their disciplines but also have acknowledged breadth in recognizing and promoting interdisciplinary collaborations. Diesner brings to this role her expertise in computational social science, human-centered data science, network analysis, natural language processing, machine learning, and responsible computing.

Assistant Professor Jana Diesner

La Barre recognized for diversity work

Associate Professor Kathryn La Barre received an Honorable Mention in the category of Outstanding Faculty/Staff at the 8th annual Diversity and Social Justice Education Awards. The awards recognize undergraduates, graduate students, faculty, staff, and student organizations "that have sought to address marginalization, oppression, and/or privilege in their communities." La Barre serves as chair of the iSchool's Diversity Committee.

Kathryn La Barre